ARGENTINA – BUDGET

ARGENTINA – BUDGET

Perhaps no other city in the world is as beguiling as Buenos Aires, Argentina’s capital city. Most outsiders only know the country in Hollywood clips, blips, and larger-than-life personas, from Evita (as played by Madonna) to the incredible soccer greats like Diego Maradona and Leonel Messi. And let us not forget the Pope is Argentine.

Buenos Aires is how the New World and Old World blend so harmoniously. Grand dame Art Noveau apartment buildings, dating back centuries with the original crown molding preserved, coexist in the Paris of South America with contemporary, shiny new skyscrapers, and it all works together.

The city is fast-paced and trendsetting in art, design, and style, but, at the same time, the cobbler on the corner and the neighborhood’s beloved tailor are toiling away in the same location where they have been for decades. Argentines themselves are much like what the city shows, too. They have a deep respect and admiration for the past, yet they are always energetically innovating and looking forward.

Buenos Aires’ most famous cultural export is tango, the song and dance filled with passion, sensuality, longing, and nostalgia that does so much to explain the essence and character, culture, and creativity of Buenos Aires. Here, everything is approached, considered, and conducted with passion.

Cost Of Living In Buenos Aires

Other destinations in Latin America offer far more affordable retirement options, but nowhere else in this part of the world offers a comparable standard of living. Buenos Aires is a city of neighborhoods, each with its own look, feel, and personality. Foreign residents concentrate especially in Palermo, Belgrano, and Recoleta. Buenos Aires is a city where you could enjoy a rich, full, even luxury-standard retirement lifestyle on a budget of as little as 13,024 Argentine pesos per month.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Buenos Aires, Argentina

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent ARS 4,729
Gas ARS 430
Electricity ARS 258
Water ARS 215
Telephone ARS 172
Internet ARS 129
Cable TV ARS 172
Groceries ARS 4,300
Entertainment ARS 2,580
Total ARS 12,985

 

Infrastructure In Buenos Aires

Because of its cozy neighborhoods or maybe the incredible people watching, Buenos Aires is very much a walking city. (Get a good stroller if you have children.) Biking is increasingly popular and bike trails are growing in number— you can rent a bike in Palermo.

There was a time when Buenos Aires had a cutting edge transportation system—after all, it was the first South American city to open a subway system, which remains the fastest way to get around town. When the British came, they administered the building of the country’s infrastructure, especially its large railway system (and the national banking system). In fact, trains still travel on the left-hand side of tracks—a last stand of British influence.

Today, however, travel in Argentina might come as a shock. First off, Argentines are the second worst drivers on the road. Every driver has his own set of rules. There is no road rage. It’s accepted that, as they say, “Signs are suggestions. A stop sign is an idea.” Still, cabs are so cheap that some people take a cab both ways to work each day. In addition, the highways are well maintained. And some laws really work well for drivers: If you are forced to wait for more than two minutes before you can pay at a toll, for example, cars begin to beep and the tolls are opened so that traffic doesn’t back up.

Buenos Aires is also known as the Paris of Latin America, and, indeed, with few exceptions, anything available in Paris can also be found in Buenos Aires, at lesser cost and with a Latin edge, including five-star restaurants, nightclubs, comedy clubs, open-air cafes, world-class live theater and ballet, art galleries, museums, English-language bookstores, indoor shopping malls and outdoor antiques markets, European-style parks, plazas, and gardens, plus classic-style architecture of the kind found in but a handful of cities around the world.

If you want to embrace a retirement filled with art and history, culture and interesting company, but you can’t afford Paris, look to Buenos Aires.

It has a tremendous variety and diversity of restaurants, shopping, museums, and parks and does qualify as a walking city—though it’s too big to walk across in one go.

Climate In Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires enjoys four seasons throughout the year. The city has a warm humid temperate climate with hot summers and no dry season. The temperature ranges from 46 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit and is rarely below 39 or above 88.

Mendoza offers an Old World lifestyle on the doorstep of the best wine routes in Argentina at an affordable cost. Valle de Uco is one of the biggest wine areas in Argentina, about an hour-and-a-half from Mendoza City.

Mendoza in general is Argentina's most important wine producer thanks to its unique terroir and Andean snowmelt irrigation. This is a region of extraordinary natural beauty, clean air, and 300-plus days of sunshine each year.

For the active retiree who isn’t ready to sit back and rock on his front porch, there really is no better place than the Mendoza province of Argentina. Sports enthusiasts enjoy skiing, hiking, climbing, bird-watching, white-water rafting, kayaking, even kite-surfing.

One of the best parts about the Mendoza region of Argentina is that it is, on one hand, remote and private, yet, on the other hand, lively and full of opportunities for distraction and diversion. In February is the annual folklore festival, in November is the Fiesta de la Tradicion, and, probably of greatest interest in this part of the world, come March are the annual harvest festivals.

Cost Of Living In Mendoza

The cost of living in Mendoza, Argentina, has risen sharply in peso terms over the past five years, but the quality of life in this beautiful region of Argentina is hard to beat. Mendoza still offers, price rises and all, the opportunity to enjoy the romantic vineyard lifestyle for a fraction the cost of a similar lifestyle in California or Europe.

Socializing is a way of life in Argentina so make sure your overall budget allows and includes this. People in this part of the world adore going out, and, should you decide to live here among them, this will become part of your lifestyle, too. The good news is that entertainment is affordable and accessible. A couple can live comfortably in Mendoza for less than 12,938 Argentine pesos per month.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Mendoza, Argentina

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent ARS 4,670
Gas N/A Included with electricity.
Electricity ARS 550
Water N/A Included with electricity.
Telephone ARS 170
Internet N/A Included with cable TV.
Cable TV ARS 550
Groceries ARS 3,400
Entertainment ARS 3,400
Total ARS 12,740

Infrastructure In Mendoza

Mendoza is not only lively and bustling but also livable. Cycling is a preferred means of transportation. Vuelta Ciclistica de Mendoza is a primary road for cyclists. The city's streets are shaded by sycamore and acacia trees, making rambling a pleasure. The whole of the city is clean and well-kept. Mendoza city is built to enable people to walk to everything, including excellent restaurants that serve more Mendocinos and expat residents than tourists.

An earthquake devastated Mendoza in 1861, and, when the Argentines rebuilt it, they did it right. The landscaped plazas are adorned with fountains and intricate tile work, including murals that tell tales from Argentine and Spanish literature. Look and you'll see the story of Don Quixote.

Mendoza is an ideal base for exploring the rest of Argentina, too, from cosmopolitan Buenos Aires, to the rolling pampas, to the ski regions of Patagonia. You are only a few hours from Chile's capital, Santiago. The airport in Mendoza City offers a number of direct daily flights to Buenos Aires (about two hours away)... perfect when you need a taste of big city life.

Climate In Mendoza

Mendoza has a near-perfect climate. Its laid-back atmosphere, safe cities, strong infrastructure, unspoiled culture, affordability, and reliable and friendly people are drawing the attention of expats from around the world.

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ARGENTINA – BUDGET

Perhaps no other city in the world is as beguiling as Buenos Aires, Argentina’s capital city. Most outsiders only know the country in Hollywood clips, blips, and larger-than-life personas, from Evita (as played by Madonna) to the incredible soccer greats like Diego Maradona and Leonel Messi. And let us not forget the Pope is Argentine.

Buenos Aires is how the New World and Old World blend so harmoniously. Grand dame Art Noveau apartment buildings, dating back centuries with the original crown molding preserved, coexist in the Paris of South America with contemporary, shiny new skyscrapers, and it all works together.

The city is fast-paced and trendsetting in art, design, and style, but, at the same time, the cobbler on the corner and the neighborhood’s beloved tailor are toiling away in the same location where they have been for decades. Argentines themselves are much like what the city shows, too. They have a deep respect and admiration for the past, yet they are always energetically innovating and looking forward.

Buenos Aires’ most famous cultural export is tango, the song and dance filled with passion, sensuality, longing, and nostalgia that does so much to explain the essence and character, culture, and creativity of Buenos Aires. Here, everything is approached, considered, and conducted with passion.

Cost Of Living In Buenos Aires

Other destinations in Latin America offer far more affordable retirement options, but nowhere else in this part of the world offers a comparable standard of living. Buenos Aires is a city of neighborhoods, each with its own look, feel, and personality. Foreign residents concentrate especially in Palermo, Belgrano, and Recoleta. Buenos Aires is a city where you could enjoy a rich, full, even luxury-standard retirement lifestyle on a budget of as little as 13,024 Argentine pesos per month.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Buenos Aires, Argentina

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent ARS 4,729
Gas ARS 430
Electricity ARS 258
Water ARS 215
Telephone ARS 172
Internet ARS 129
Cable TV ARS 172
Groceries ARS 4,300
Entertainment ARS 2,580
Total ARS 12,985

 

Infrastructure In Buenos Aires

Because of its cozy neighborhoods or maybe the incredible people watching, Buenos Aires is very much a walking city. (Get a good stroller if you have children.) Biking is increasingly popular and bike trails are growing in number— you can rent a bike in Palermo.

There was a time when Buenos Aires had a cutting edge transportation system—after all, it was the first South American city to open a subway system, which remains the fastest way to get around town. When the British came, they administered the building of the country’s infrastructure, especially its large railway system (and the national banking system). In fact, trains still travel on the left-hand side of tracks—a last stand of British influence.

Today, however, travel in Argentina might come as a shock. First off, Argentines are the second worst drivers on the road. Every driver has his own set of rules. There is no road rage. It’s accepted that, as they say, “Signs are suggestions. A stop sign is an idea.” Still, cabs are so cheap that some people take a cab both ways to work each day. In addition, the highways are well maintained. And some laws really work well for drivers: If you are forced to wait for more than two minutes before you can pay at a toll, for example, cars begin to beep and the tolls are opened so that traffic doesn’t back up.

Buenos Aires is also known as the Paris of Latin America, and, indeed, with few exceptions, anything available in Paris can also be found in Buenos Aires, at lesser cost and with a Latin edge, including five-star restaurants, nightclubs, comedy clubs, open-air cafes, world-class live theater and ballet, art galleries, museums, English-language bookstores, indoor shopping malls and outdoor antiques markets, European-style parks, plazas, and gardens, plus classic-style architecture of the kind found in but a handful of cities around the world.

If you want to embrace a retirement filled with art and history, culture and interesting company, but you can’t afford Paris, look to Buenos Aires.

It has a tremendous variety and diversity of restaurants, shopping, museums, and parks and does qualify as a walking city—though it’s too big to walk across in one go.

Climate In Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires enjoys four seasons throughout the year. The city has a warm humid temperate climate with hot summers and no dry season. The temperature ranges from 46 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit and is rarely below 39 or above 88.