El Salvador

The bright blue sky and green palm trees along the beach in El Salvador

El Salvador

El Salvador Is An Emerging Retirement Haven

It’s not on our list of top overseas havens yet, but this is a country on the rise with good fundamentals. The economy is sound, and tax rates are reasonable.

Highways are new, thanks in part to an international consortium called the Millenium Fund. Roads are clear and clean, and the people are hard-working. The literacy rate is better than 80%, and the standard of living improves yearly.

This country is one of the bright stars in the Central American orbit. Its young president is energetic and a polished communicator who appears to be delivering on his promises of jobs, education, and a better future. True, he is the first freely elected official of a left-wing party, but, in the wake of previous excesses of juntas and right-wing death squads, perhaps this is an understandable swing of the pendulum.

Crime was once a big problem, thanks to the gang known as Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13. Today, following years of police action, the few gang members who aren’t in prison have become a danger only to themselves. Recognizable by their extensive tattoos, they’re prone to fight with other gang members, typically over guns, drugs, and territory. The good news is that the police are well-trained and honest…a rarity in Central America. They’re usually ex-military and paid on time (another rarity). They won’t ask you for a bribe, nor should you offer them one.

In the country’s capital city is large and sprawling, with a population estimated at 1.7 million people. Set in a large bowl, San Salvador is surrounded by green hills and volcanoes, the greatest of which is the San Salvador volcano (Quetzaltepeque). It has two peaks, one a sharply pointed landmark known as Picacho (6,000 feet), the second, slightly smaller, known as El Boqueron (Big Mouth) and 5,500 feet in altitude. At the bottom of El Boqueron is a second crater, formed after a small eruption in 1917, that’s perfectly round.

We recommend settling in and around the capital, specifically to either the Colonia San Benito or the Colonia Escalon. These are safe, cosmopolitan, and relatively quiet neighborhoods. The rents and prices are urban (figure US$500 to US$800 per month furnished), but the outer portions of the city, while cheaper, are grittier.

The country is small (you can cross it in four hours), so the beach is 30 minutes away from San Salvador.

FEATURED PRODUCTS

Overseas Retirement Circle

Discover Europe Kit

Our most comprehensive resource on Europe, including reports on all the top destinations!


LEARN MORE ►
Overseas Living Letter

Overseas Living Letter

Yes, You Can Live Well On $723 A Month Or Less: Here's How!


LEARN MORE ►
Country Retirement Reports

Country Retirement Reports

Browse our library of over 70 Country Retirement Reports... only US$9.95 each!


LEARN MORE ►

El Salvador

El Salvador Is An Emerging Retirement Haven

It’s not on our list of top overseas havens yet, but this is a country on the rise with good fundamentals. The economy is sound, and tax rates are reasonable.

Highways are new, thanks in part to an international consortium called the Millenium Fund. Roads are clear and clean, and the people are hard-working. The literacy rate is better than 80%, and the standard of living improves yearly.

This country is one of the bright stars in the Central American orbit. Its young president is energetic and a polished communicator who appears to be delivering on his promises of jobs, education, and a better future. True, he is the first freely elected official of a left-wing party, but, in the wake of previous excesses of juntas and right-wing death squads, perhaps this is an understandable swing of the pendulum.

Crime was once a big problem, thanks to the gang known as Mara Salvatrucha, or MS-13. Today, following years of police action, the few gang members who aren’t in prison have become a danger only to themselves. Recognizable by their extensive tattoos, they’re prone to fight with other gang members, typically over guns, drugs, and territory. The good news is that the police are well-trained and honest…a rarity in Central America. They’re usually ex-military and paid on time (another rarity). They won’t ask you for a bribe, nor should you offer them one.

In the country’s capital city is large and sprawling, with a population estimated at 1.7 million people. Set in a large bowl, San Salvador is surrounded by green hills and volcanoes, the greatest of which is the San Salvador volcano (Quetzaltepeque). It has two peaks, one a sharply pointed landmark known as Picacho (6,000 feet), the second, slightly smaller, known as El Boqueron (Big Mouth) and 5,500 feet in altitude. At the bottom of El Boqueron is a second crater, formed after a small eruption in 1917, that’s perfectly round.

We recommend settling in and around the capital, specifically to either the Colonia San Benito or the Colonia Escalon. These are safe, cosmopolitan, and relatively quiet neighborhoods. The rents and prices are urban (figure US$500 to US$800 per month furnished), but the outer portions of the city, while cheaper, are grittier.

The country is small (you can cross it in four hours), so the beach is 30 minutes away from San Salvador.