Articles Related to Retire to mendoza

Argentina is the fifth-largest wine producer in the world. Chilean wine may be more known in the United States, but that is largely because, until recently, Argentina consumed most of the wine it produced itself. Over the past decade, however, Argentine vineyards have grown and expanded, and exports have increased in turn.

As the vineyard industry in this country is maturing, it is also expanding to include wine country tourism. Many vineyards in Argentina now offer tours, wine-tasting rooms, and restaurants. One winery I visited last year had been designed specifically for tourism and as a venue for special events, with a bar, restaurant, and even an art museum. The winery building was laid out to maximize tour potential, while still being efficient and functional, showcasing the Argentine vineyard lifestyle.

A colleague, an Argentine, is also tapping into the expanding vineyard tourism industry. He has conceived and is well into building a vineyard surrounding a residential development in Valle de Uco, one of the biggest wine areas in Argentina, about an hour-and-a-half from Mendoza City. Mendoza in general is Argentina's most important wine producer thanks to its unique terroir and Andean snowmelt irrigation. This is a region of extraordinary natural beauty, clean air, and 300-plus days of sunshine each year.

The design for La Morada de los Andes has incorporated residential lots among 1,000 acres of vines, 4.5 acres of which have been set aside for lot owners. As an owner here, you will be able to reap the rewards of the wine the grapes from these vines produce, which should be about 5,000 bottles annually.

The idea is for lot owners to be able to enjoy the entire living-among-the-vines experience, including enjoying the fruits of their own vines, without having to make the investment of time, money, or effort to run their own vineyard operation.

If you've been reading my reports for any time, you know that one of my regular recommendations is to buy what you see. In this case, the developer put in the infrastructure before he started selling lots. Buying what you see, therefore, means buying completed roads, water, electricity, and even access to a beautiful clubhouse, in a dramatic setting, with the Andes Mountains as the backdrop.

In addition, the vineyard has been fully planted.

One of the best parts about the Mendoza region of Argentina is that it is, on one hand, remote and private, yet, on the other hand, lively and full of opportunities for distraction and diversion. In February is the annual folklore festival; in November is the Fiesta de la Tradicion; and, probably of greatest interest in this part of the world, come March are the annual harvest festivals.

Day to day, you could go hiking in the Andes, mountain biking, horse riding, even skiing in winter, though you'll have to travel a bit for that. The city of Mendoza, with a population of more than one million, has restaurants, theaters, and, on the weekends, an artist fair on the main square (I bought a custom-made knife on my last visit).

What does it take to buy into this lifestyle? Lots at La Morada de Los Andes start at less than US$100,000, and all lots are more than ½ acre. With just 83 lots in total, you'll have neighbors, but you won't feel crowded. And again, the infrastructure is in, so you could begin building your house right away. The developer can manage the construction for you, or you could arrange it on your own.

The best part is that the developer doesn't need cash from sales to put in the infrastructure. As a result, he's able to offer very flexible financing packages. You could buy your vineyard lot today with no money down and payments over two, three, or four years at 8% interest. Finance a US$100,000 lot over four years, and your payment would be less than US$2,500 a month. Or you could make a down payment, and the developer would finance the rest at no interest.

HOA fees are expected to run about US$165 a month, but the developer is waiving those until 2014. As an owner, you'll enjoy the annual wine allocation I mentioned earlier, which is 30 bottles per year for each lot. Any surplus bottles will be sold to help offset the HOA fees.

On top of that the developer is offering Live and Invest Overseas readers a US$5,000 discount, at least for the first 20 lots purchased. Nine lots have already been sold, meaning the next 11 buyers can save US$5,000.

Argentines enjoy their wine and their parillas. Once you've experienced the lifestyle that goes along with these things, you'll understand why. For more details, you can inquire here.

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Kathleen Peddicord

Kathleen Peddicord is the founder of the Live and Invest Overseas publishing group. With more than 25 years experience covering this beat, Kathleen reports daily on current opportunities for living, retiring, and investing overseas in her free e-letter.

Her book, How To Retire Overseas—Everything You Need To Know To Live Well Abroad For Less, was recently released by Penguin Books.

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