Vietnam Budget

Vietnam Budget

Danang

Danang is located within 100 miles of three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the ancient towns of Hoi An and Hue and the Hindu ruins of the Champa Kingdom at Mỹ Sơn. This makes Danang a perfect base for the history buff. Its proximity to such major attractions allows residents of Danang the opportunity to enjoy a huge selection of restaurants, spas, golf courses, and other amenities.

Danang is not a tourist town. Clean and modern, Danang’s new skyscrapers give its downtown a decidedly cosmopolitan look. However, you won’t find the hustle and bustle here that you find in other Vietnamese cities. Other than along the riverfront, there are few, if any, vendors, and we saw no beggars during our entire time in Danang. The city has the look and feel of a comfortable, safe, and economically viable place to live.

No matter which direction you look, beauty surrounds Danang. The South China Sea’s clear, warm waters form the city’s eastern boundary. The clean, fine-sand beach starts at the northern edge of the city and continues southward all the way to Hoi An. During the autumn months, the normally calm waters will often have waves large enough for surfing. Yet Danang is not a beach town. The beaches receive surprisingly little use, and no matter the time of year, it’s generally easy to find a deserted stretch of sand.

There’s something about Danang that feels different from other places in Southeast

Asia, and certainly quite different than any other place in Vietnam. It’s a big city of nearly a million people, but it has a small-town feel about it. Danang is more than just a transportation hub, it makes a wonderful destination in its own right.

Cost Of Living In Danang

Danang is a top-pick for expats living in Vietnam and a couple live comfortably on less than US$1,100 per month and about US$200 less renting a house.

Two- or three-bedroom houses in nice areas start at around US$400 per month and for large, luxury homes, range up to around US$800 per month. Midrange and top-end condominiums start at about US$600 per month, with an upper range of around US$1,000 per month for condos with an ocean view. Single-family homes tend to be larger and less expensive to rent than condominiums.

Electricity runs around US$100 per month for a two- or three bedroom home during the hot months—more if you use the air conditioner during the day as well as at night.

Cellular telephones are not “locked” in Vietnam. You are free to use any provider you want and switch at any time. Promotions are offered constantly, making calls extremely affordable. If you buy minutes during a promotion (which are usually displayed on the screen of your mobile phone) and don’t make a lot of international calls, you can expect your monthly calls and texts to cost less than US$3 per month.

The water that comes out of the tap is considered potable, and is charged by units, with one unit being one cubic meter, or 1,000 liters. Each unit about a US quarter. Most people spend less than US$5 per month for tap water.

Cooking stoves usually run on propane gas. Cooking gas is supplied in tanks similar to those used for outdoor barbecue grills in the West. They are exchanged when empty and cost about 300,000 VND to fill (click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.) Unless you do a great deal of cooking at home, you’ll find that a tank of gas will last for several months.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Danang, Vietnam

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent VND 12,000,000
Gas VND 60,000 Used for cooking.
Electricity VND 2,000,000 Moderate air conditioning use.
Water N/A Included with electricity.
Telephone VND 60,000 Prepaid cellphone.
Internet VND 200,000 Unlimited access.
Cable TV VND 600,000
Groceries VND 2,500,000
Entertainment VND 3,000,000
Total VND 20,420,000

 

Hoi An

Located less than an hour from Danang, the town of Hoi An is a gem on the central coast of Vietnam. For travelers, it is one of a handful of must-see destinations on the Southeast Asian grand tour. The old downtown is a unique mix of perfectly preserved ancient Chinese and Japanese architecture harkening back to a time long ago when it was a major trading port.

Vietnam is one of the most energetic countries in the world, and finding a tranquil spot can be a challenge. This is one of the reasons why visitors find Hoi An so charming. It isn’t on a major highway, and it’s almost an hour’s drive to the closest airport or train station.

The Cham Islands, a UNESCO Global Biosphere Reserve, lie 13 miles northeast of Hoi An and are a chain of mostly undeveloped islands with lush forests, coral reefs, a couple of small fishing villages, and numerous remote, unspoiled beaches.

There are mountains to the north and west of Hoi An, the most beautiful of which are the ones just north of Danang. The mountains to the west are only a short distance away and offer many opportunities for exploration, as this part of Vietnam has seen only minimal development. Peaks in this area reach almost 2,000 meters (6,000 feet), offering views to the ocean on the east and the Laotian wilderness to the west.

South of Hoi An, the land is generally flat and agricultural. A drive through the countryside here will treat travelers to the sight of verdant green rice paddies and patches of diverse tropical flora. Ladies wearing the iconic cone hats work year-round, alongside their husbands and children, preening the fields. Small villages and communes dot the land, and a few ancient Cham towers can still be found near the coast.

Cost Of Living In Hoi An

Most people, when they first arrive in Hoi An, will stay in a hotel or guesthouse while they look for a place to stay long term. An almost unlimited number of short-term rooms are available ranging from less than US$15 per night to US$100 or more. Many guesthouses are happy to negotiate a discounted rate for weekly or monthly stays. It is unlikely that you would have a kitchen, but with so many options for eating out, this is hardly an inconvenience.

Currently there are no apartments and very few condominiums in Hoi An, so if you decide to stay here long-term, you’ll need to find a house to rent. Hoi An enjoys a very low cost of living, and you can expect to find comfortable homes here for an affordable price. Houses range in price from around US$250 to US$1,000 per month, though the average house rental is about US$400 per month.

Most homes are rented fully furnished. Unfurnished homes cost less, but are a little harder to find. Utilities and housekeeping are paid separately from rent.

There are several Internet service providers in Hoi An, offering both 3G and ADSL connections. Generally they offer several Internet plans, start at around US$9.50 per month.

The largest provider of cable television in Hoi An is the Vietnam Multimedia Corporation, or VTC. A one-year subscription to their plan, which features 70 channels, including several premium English-language channels costs about US$34.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Hoi An, Vietnam

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent VND 11,494,500
Gas VND 104,496 Used for cooking.
Electricity VND 1,044,950 Moderate air conditioning use.
Water VND 417,982
Telephone VND 104,496
Internet VND 313,487 Unlimited access.
Cable TV VND 626,973
Groceries VND 3,134,870
Entertainment VND 5,224,780
Total VND 22,466,534

Nha Trang

Most foreigners who live in Nha Trang—and there are close to a thousand of them—seem to agree on one thing. Once they have moved here, they never want to leave. Here, you can be footsteps away from one of the most beautiful bays in the world or a short drive from some of the prettiest landscapes in Southeast Asia.

Nha Trang is a special place—it's a melting pot of nationalities and cultures. You can eat at a different restaurant every day, enjoying a huge variety of Vietnamese and international cuisines that reflect the tastes of Nha Trang's diverse population. French speakers are as comfortable here as English speakers; large numbers of French and French-Canadian expatriates reside alongside the Europeans, Russians, Australians, Indians, and Americans who live here. A large number of Vietnamese are fluent in English, French, or both, making communication less of a challenge than it is in many other Asian cities.

There are modern supermarkets and upscale clothing stores, and convenient, vibrant traditional markets. There are numerous spas and an excellent hot spring spa and resort. Vietnam's largest amusement park and aquarium is in Nha Trang, and there is even a miniature golf course here—the first one in Asia.

Nha Trang is a social place, and with such a large foreign population, there are plenty of opportunities to make friends. Nha Trang has been a popular resort town for almost a century, and foreigners have always been made to feel welcome. Spend a few months here, and you'll likely have as many Vietnamese friends as you will expats. With relatively straight-forward immigration laws, it's easy to stay in Vietnam long-term and join the ever-growing number of foreigners who have decided to make Nha Trang their home.

Cost Of Living In Nha Trang

Nha Trang's low cost of living allows you to enjoy a high quality lifestyle at an affordable price. A couple can live well in Nha Trang for about US$750 per month.

Renting a house or apartment here is generally very easy on the budget. There are decent apartments in good neighborhoods starting at around US$125; for this amount, you could expect to rent an unfurnished, two-bedroom apartment with 24-hour security. However, these units would not include housekeeping or any utilities and may not include an air conditioner. An experienced full time housekeeper will cost around US$125 per month and a meal for two won't strain the budget for more than perhaps US$10.

Although rents are often quoted in U.S. dollars, the law states that rent—other than for hotels—should be paid in Vietnamese dong. In Nha Trang, many owners prefer to be paid in dollars and if dong is offered as payment, it may be converted at a less favorable rate than a bank would charge. Additionally, the banks in Vietnam may not give as good of an exchange rate as you could get outside of the country. So it's best to come to Vietnam with an adequate supply of U.S. dollars.

A visit to the doctor in Nha Trang costs about US$10 and many expatriates living here say that they are quite comfortable receiving care in these facilities for general medical issues, broken bones, and infections. Additionally, there are several excellent physicians with various specialties scattered throughout the city. On average a visit with a specialist, with a full examination, costs around US$2.

When you have an urge for a massage, you'll find a wide selection of spas and a multitude of individual practitioners. A skilled sixty minute massage by a blind masseur costs only around US$2. A one-hour massage at an upscale spa will generally be less than US$20.

If you shop for food at the traditional market, it's important to have a sense of what something should cost. Ask a trusted Vietnamese friend what a fair price would be for a particular item. They'll usually give you a price range. When you find the item, it isn't uncommon to be charged the same or even less than what you expect – usually a bit less than that same item would cost in the grocery store.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Nha Trang, Vietnam

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent VND 7,403,440
Gas VND 122,814 Used for cooking.
Electricity VND 736,962 Moderate air conditioning use.
Water VND 122,814
Telephone VND 122,814
Internet VND 245,627 Unlimited access.
Cable TV VND 122,814
Groceries VND 3,681,356
Entertainment VND 3,681,356
Total VND 16,239,997

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Vietnam Budget

Danang

Danang is located within 100 miles of three UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the ancient towns of Hoi An and Hue and the Hindu ruins of the Champa Kingdom at Mỹ Sơn. This makes Danang a perfect base for the history buff. Its proximity to such major attractions allows residents of Danang the opportunity to enjoy a huge selection of restaurants, spas, golf courses, and other amenities.

Danang is not a tourist town. Clean and modern, Danang’s new skyscrapers give its downtown a decidedly cosmopolitan look. However, you won’t find the hustle and bustle here that you find in other Vietnamese cities. Other than along the riverfront, there are few, if any, vendors, and we saw no beggars during our entire time in Danang. The city has the look and feel of a comfortable, safe, and economically viable place to live.

No matter which direction you look, beauty surrounds Danang. The South China Sea’s clear, warm waters form the city’s eastern boundary. The clean, fine-sand beach starts at the northern edge of the city and continues southward all the way to Hoi An. During the autumn months, the normally calm waters will often have waves large enough for surfing. Yet Danang is not a beach town. The beaches receive surprisingly little use, and no matter the time of year, it’s generally easy to find a deserted stretch of sand.

There’s something about Danang that feels different from other places in Southeast

Asia, and certainly quite different than any other place in Vietnam. It’s a big city of nearly a million people, but it has a small-town feel about it. Danang is more than just a transportation hub, it makes a wonderful destination in its own right.

Cost Of Living In Danang

Danang is a top-pick for expats living in Vietnam and a couple live comfortably on less than US$1,100 per month and about US$200 less renting a house.

Two- or three-bedroom houses in nice areas start at around US$400 per month and for large, luxury homes, range up to around US$800 per month. Midrange and top-end condominiums start at about US$600 per month, with an upper range of around US$1,000 per month for condos with an ocean view. Single-family homes tend to be larger and less expensive to rent than condominiums.

Electricity runs around US$100 per month for a two- or three bedroom home during the hot months—more if you use the air conditioner during the day as well as at night.

Cellular telephones are not “locked” in Vietnam. You are free to use any provider you want and switch at any time. Promotions are offered constantly, making calls extremely affordable. If you buy minutes during a promotion (which are usually displayed on the screen of your mobile phone) and don’t make a lot of international calls, you can expect your monthly calls and texts to cost less than US$3 per month.

The water that comes out of the tap is considered potable, and is charged by units, with one unit being one cubic meter, or 1,000 liters. Each unit about a US quarter. Most people spend less than US$5 per month for tap water.

Cooking stoves usually run on propane gas. Cooking gas is supplied in tanks similar to those used for outdoor barbecue grills in the West. They are exchanged when empty and cost about 300,000 VND to fill (click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.) Unless you do a great deal of cooking at home, you’ll find that a tank of gas will last for several months.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Danang, Vietnam

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Rent VND 12,000,000
Gas VND 60,000 Used for cooking.
Electricity VND 2,000,000 Moderate air conditioning use.
Water N/A Included with electricity.
Telephone VND 60,000 Prepaid cellphone.
Internet VND 200,000 Unlimited access.
Cable TV VND 600,000
Groceries VND 2,500,000
Entertainment VND 3,000,000
Total VND 20,420,000