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The two countries share many similarities, and Nicaragua has the specter of the Sandinistas hanging over it. Still, it was Nicaragua, not Costa Rica that captured my heart. I was completely infatuated by this little country with such a troubled past, and I remain so. Every visit, I'm won over again. Everywhere I travel in Nicaragua, I find something that pleases me—the red-tile roofs and blue and white church steeples of colonial Granada...the glass-still surface of crater lake Apoyo as it appears from the deck of my little house on the mountainside...the barefoot children playing and laughing in Granada's central plaza...the sounds of the horses' hoofs as they pull their carriages along Granada's cobblestoned streets...

These things can't be quantified. You can't plug "classic colonial architecture" into a formula in a spreadsheet. But these can be the things that matter most. How will you know where in the world you should think about spending your time and your money? You'll just know.

The French speak of the coup de coeur, the blow to your heart you feel at certain times in your life—when, say, shopping for a new house. It's the sudden certainty that this place is it, this place is right. I'm a big believer in the importance of the coup de coeur when shopping for a new country, as well.

So, while, every day, we approach this how to retire overseas question scientifically, making lists and drawing comparisons, in the end, the decision as to where to launch your new life overseas is at least as emotional as it is intellectual or financial, for a place can make perfect sense on paper but appeal not at all in person.

That's why, at some point in your research process, you've got to get on a plane. Do the soul-searching to understand what you're looking for in your new life in retirement overseas. Identify the pluses and the minuses of the world's most appealing overseas retirement havens, as we detail them for you day-by-day in these dispatches. Identify the two or three or four countries that could be the overseas Shangri-la you seek. Then plan an extended visit in each country you think might work for you, staying on, if possible, through the least-agreeable time of year—the hurricane season, the rainy season, the peak tourist season, or the off-season, after all the tourists have gone home and nearly every shop, cafe, and restaurant in town has shut its doors until they return.

No amount of Internet research, reading, or planning can substitute for traveling around a place yourself. You've got to walk the streets, to watch the sunsets, and to meet the people. And, when you do, listen to your gut. Sometimes you'll know within 24 hours of arriving in a country. If you walk out on the street in a new place and feel safe, welcome, and comfortable, then that place could be for you.

We didn't choose Waterford, Ireland, for our first international move. It was chosen for us by my employers at the time. And we didn't visit for an extended time before we made the leap, because we didn't have time to. My husband, my daughter, and I visited for two two-week planning trips, once in July and again in September, then we arrived as full-time residents in Waterford in November.

The first couple of months living overseas is the honeymoon period. The people, the landscape, the view from your bedroom window are all new, exotic, and interesting. Nothing is cliché. You're fully occupied and engaged learning your way around and establishing yourself. After two or three months, though, your surroundings are more familiar. You've developed habits of day-to-day living, and you're able to relax a little. Suddenly, your new life isn't so much exotic and interesting as it is foreign and frustrating. You begin to miss the folks back home. By now you've made new friends in your new home, but your points of common interest are perhaps limited. They don't think like you. They don't talk like you. They don't do things the way you do them.

So it was for us when we moved to Waterford. By February, I was sad. Indescribably sad for no reason I could identify. We were comfortable in our rental cottage on the river. Kaitlin was doing well in school. Our office was established, and our daily commute was a pleasant 15-minute walk into town. All was well, but I was, frankly, miserable.

Then we took a trip to Nicaragua. After a few days on that country's sunny south Pacific coast, my sadness disappeared. What was going on?

The Irish winter. Though I'd traveled in Ireland for years, I'd never lived through an Irish winter. Some days, wintertime in Ireland, the sun rises after 9 a.m. and sets before 4 in the afternoon. In between the hours of 9 and 4, it's typically gray, drizzly, overcast, and damp.

Ireland can be a great place to call home, but before you commit to retirement in the Auld Sod, experience it in winter. Spend time in the country in January and February. Or don't. Ireland is one place that can make good sense as a part-time retirement haven. You could retire to Ireland each summer then spend your winters someplace bright and sunny. That was our strategy. After our first long winter in Waterford, we escaped to the tropics every December and returned to the Emerald Isle early March, just in time to appreciate Irish spring and summer.

Kathleen Peddicord

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I have no idea. Only you can make these determinations. It's a matter of knowing yourself. Relocating overseas can reduce your cost of living (maybe dramatically). It can mean better weather, a healthier lifestyle, a reduced tax burden, more interesting neighbors, little luxuries you can't afford back home (a full-time housekeeper, a gardener, even a driver, for example), and a generally enriched quality of life.

But none of that may compensate for an unreliable Internet connection if you like to day-trade your portfolio. For you, cheap organic produce at the local market may not make up for other realities of life in the world's developing regions--slow service, for example, or repairmen who promise to return mañana to finish the fix to your broken toilet or your leaking roof, only never to be seen nor heard from again.

For the past quarter-century, I've spent much of my time in the developing world. At this point, it takes an extraordinary frustration or disappointment to get a rise out of me. Ordinary frustrations and disappointments, of which there are many, every day, pass unnoticed.

That said, I have limits, and I'm sure you do, too. What would you find intolerable? What challenges would make you crazy? Approach it this way: Make a list of everything that's important to you. Big things, little things, silly things...

After all this time tromping around emerging markets, I have a list. I'm a little embarrassed to speak publicly of some of the things on it, but, in the spirit of helping you identify your own breaking points, I share it here, in full:

  • I must have a dishwasher in the kitchen. You can't take these for granted in much of Latin America...nor, in fact, could you in Ireland when we first moved there 15 years ago. Here in Panama, for example, not every plumber will know how to install one. It was a two-week ordeal to have one specially installed in our home in Marbella...
  • When it comes to doing laundry, I'm Maytag's biggest fan. That is to say, Americans make the best washing machines and dryers in the world. Having experimented with many other approaches to washing and drying clothes, I've decided it's worth the investment to buy U.S. when it comes to doing-laundry appliances...
  • I like to eat out regularly, and I appreciate good food and good service...
  • I enjoy good wine...
  • I like museums and live theater...
  • I'm infatuated by old buildings, renovation challenges, and historic cities, no matter how down-at-the-heels, the way some women are attracted to shoe stores...
  • I like to walk and am happiest living in a place where the easiest way to get around is using my own two feet...
  • I enjoy picnics in the park on the weekend...
  • I like flea markets and antique furniture...
  • I want to live within an hour's drive of the international airport...
  • I need regular sunshine, and I don't like cold weather...

You get the idea.

Now, here's another list...of things I don't mind but that you might. These are the kinds of challenges, nuisances, and frustrations you could reasonably expect to encounter once you leave developed-world living behind. These are the kinds of things I've come to take in stride:

  • Car horns, fireworks, barking dogs, blaring boom boxes, and other affronts to public quiet...
  • Taxis with broken door handles and no taillights...
  • Bugs at the beach and snakes in the jungle...
  • Broken sidewalks and pot-holed highways...
  • Dirt roads that become impassable and rivers that flood their banks in the rainy season...
  • Paying more for imported comfort foods (including French cheeses and Spanish hams, for example...which, yes, are available here in Panama's capital city)...
  • Communicating in a language that I don't really speak...
  • Drivers who've never been introduced to the rules of the road and pedestrians, sometimes on horseback, who think they rule the road...
  • Plus servicemen who show up late or not at all...tradesmen who miss appointments...waiters who forget the starter course...cooks who don't know the difference between a 2-minute egg and a 14-minute egg...people who give directions with confidence when, in fact, they have no idea how to get where you're trying to go...

Etc.

It's all part of the day-to-day here in paradise.

Kathleen PeddicordContinue Reading:

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"But those aren't the reasons I recommend Nicaragua over its neighbor to the south to anyone who asks or why I chose to focus my time and attention in Nicaragua years ago, when I could as easily have based myself in Costa Rica. Nicaragua simply appealed to me more," Jeff explains, "for reasons that I have trouble explaining."

I knew what he meant. I visited Costa Rica for the first time more than 25 years ago. I've returned probably 25 times since. Its Pacific coast is beautiful, as is its mountainous interior. Great surfing, great bird-watching, great boating, great fishing...Costa Rica has all these things. When I first traveled to this country, it was also very affordable and boasted the world's premier foreign retiree program. Still, I didn't get it. I could list out the advantages and benefits of living in Costa Rica, but I couldn't make myself want to live there.

Then, a few years later, I traveled to Nicaragua. I knew within a few hours of wandering around colonial Granada that this was a place I wanted to return to. This was a place I could call home, for visiting it for the first time felt like coming home.

The two countries share many similarities, and Nicaragua has the specter of the Sandinistas hanging over it. Still, it was Nicaragua, not Costa Rica that captured my heart. I was completely infatuated by this little country with such a troubled past, and I remain so. Every visit, I'm won over again. Everywhere I travel in Nicaragua, I find something that pleases me--the red tile roofs and blue and white church steeples of colonial Granada...the glass-still surface of crater lake Apoyo as it appears from the deck of my little house on the mountainside...the barefoot children playing and laughing in Granada's central plaza...the sounds of the horses' hoofs as they pull their carriages along Granada's cobblestoned streets...

These things can't be quantified. You can't plug "classic colonial architecture" into a formula in a spreadsheet. But these can be the things that matter most. How will you know where in the world you should think about spending your time and your money? You'll just know. The French speak of the coup de coeur, the blow to your heart you feel at certain times in your life--when, say, shopping for a new house. It's the sudden certainty that this place is it, this place is right. I'm a big believer in the importance of the coup de coeur when shopping for a new country, as well.

So, while, every day, we approach this how to retire overseas question scientifically, making lists and drawing comparisons, in the end, the decision as to where to launch your new life overseas is at least as emotional as it is intellectual or financial, for a place can make perfect sense on paper but appeal not at all in person.

That's why, at some point in your research process, you've got to get on a plane. Do the soul-searching to understand what you're looking for in your new life in retirement overseas. Identify the pluses and the minuses of the world's most appealing overseas retirement havens, as we detail them for you day-by-day in these dispatches. Identify the two or three or four countries that could be the overseas Shangri-la you seek. Then plan an extended visit in each country you think might work for you, staying on, if possible, through the least-agreeable time of year--the hurricane season, the rainy season, the peak tourist season, or the off-season, after all the tourists have gone home and nearly every shop, café, and restaurant in town has shut its doors until they return.

No amount of Internet research, reading, or planning can substitute for traveling around a place yourself. You've got to walk the streets, to watch the sunsets, and to meet the people. And, when you do, listen to your gut. Sometimes you'll know within 24 hours of arriving in a country. If you walk out on the street in a new place and feel safe, welcome, and comfortable, then that place could be for you.

We didn't choose Waterford, Ireland, for our first international move. It was chosen for us by my employers at the time. And we didn't visit for an extended time before we made the leap, because we didn't have time to. My husband, my daughter, and I visited for two two-week planning trips, once in July and again in September, then we arrived as full-time residents in Waterford in November.

The first couple of months living overseas is the honeymoon period. The people, the landscape, the view from your bedroom window are all new, exotic, and interesting. Nothing is cliché. You're fully occupied and engaged learning your way around and establishing yourself. After two or three months, though, your surroundings are more familiar. You've developed habits of day-to-day living, and you're able to relax a little. Suddenly, your new life isn't so much exotic and interesting as it is foreign and frustrating. You begin to miss the folks back home. By now you've made new friends in your new home, but your points of common interest are perhaps limited. They don't think like you. They don't talk like you. They don't do things the way you do them.

So it was for us when we moved to Waterford. By February, I was sad. Indescribably sad for no reason I could identify. We were comfortable in our rental cottage on the river. Kaitlin was doing well in school. Our office was established, and our daily commute was a pleasant 15-minute walk into town. All was well, but I was, frankly, miserable.

Then we took a trip to Nicaragua. After a few days on that country's sunny south Pacific coast, my sadness disappeared. What was going on?

The Irish winter. Though I'd traveled in Ireland for years, I'd never lived through an Irish winter. Some days, wintertime in Ireland, the sun rises after 9 a.m. and sets before 4 in the afternoon. In between the hours of 9 and 4, it's typically gray, drizzly, overcast, and damp.

Ireland can be a great place to call home, but before you commit to retirement in the Auld Sod, experience it in winter. Spend time in the country in January and February. Or don't. Ireland is one place that makes good sense as a part-time retirement haven. You could retire to Ireland each summer then spend your winters someplace bright and sunny. That was our strategy. After our first long winter in Waterford, we escaped to the tropics every December and returned to the Emerald Isle early March, just in time to appreciate Irish spring and summer.

Kathleen Peddicord

P.S. I promised two important things I've learned in almost 15 years as an American abroad. Part 2 coming soon.Continue Reading:

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Kathleen Peddicord

Kathleen Peddicord is the founder of the Live and Invest Overseas publishing group. With more than 25 years experience covering this beat, Kathleen reports daily on current opportunities for living, retiring, and investing overseas in her free e-letter.

Her book, How To Retire Overseas—Everything You Need To Know To Live Well Abroad For Less, was recently released by Penguin Books.

Read more here.

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