Top 5 Foodie Destinations

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Hungry? Instead of driving to the closest Rotten Ronnie Mac’s drive-thru, why not set your sights a little further? Here are Live and Invest Overseas’ top 5 foodie destinations (no reservation required).

  1. George Town, Malaysia

Famed for street food, or hawker food as it’s known locally, Malaysia’s George Town is home to an eclectic population and a vibrant restaurant and market scene. From Indian curries to Chinese noodles to the famous griddle-cooked crispy pancakes, stuffed with peanuts and rich palm sugar, the range of fresh and fascinating food is endless and cheap to boot. George Town residents could eat out every night and never get bored (or go broke).

Malaysia

  1. Abruzzo, Italy

With terrain that reaches from mountaintops to the seashore, Italy’s Abruzzo region is home to the most varied of Italian cuisine.

Try the all’aquilana sauce—beef marrow with saffron, eggs, cream, and butter—or maybe the gnocchi carrati, flavored with bacon, eggs, and pecorino cheese. Wash it down with a glass of famous Montepulciano d’Abruzzo and wonder why you didn’t get here sooner.

Italy

  1. Istanbul, Turkey

There’s more to Turkish food than doner kebabs. Think hot bread fresh from the oven, gently spiced ground beef with tangy yogurt sauce, slow-roasted lamb, and sweet, syrupy baklava. With delicious aromas rising from every street-side stall, and fruit and vegetable markets spanning city blocks, in Istanbul, eating out and staying in can be equally delightful.

Turkey

  1. Chiang Mai, Thailand

Fresh and spicy, marrying herbs and spices in distinctive blends, it’s no wonder Thai food has become a global favorite. Head north to Chiang Mai to experience Thai with a twist. The influence of neighbors Burma and China is evident in the keen use of ginger and turmeric and the prevalence of sticky rice over steamed.

Thailand

  1. Languedoc, France

It’s difficult to imagine a place on earth where the quest for a perfect mouthful is taken more seriously than France. Traditionally, the cuisine of Languedoc has been long underrated; however, it is now recognized for its variety and exciting Arab and Catalan influences. Live like a local and enjoy long lunches of cassoulet and crème catalan, accompanied by an award-winning Languedoc vin.

France

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About Author

Rebecca Adams

Rebecca Adams is a New Zealander living in Panama City. She has visited more than 35 countries around the world and is actively working to up that number.