Barcelona

Barcelona

Barcelona, Spain

The city of Barcelona is a vibrant, colorful, proud, interesting place that’s got the benefit of the passion of the Spanish combined with the efficiency and organization of the Catalans. The city’s energy continues today despite Spain’s economic woes. People live, work, and shop in most of the city neighborhoods and districts, so each has its own community spirit, and some even have their own fiestas.

Barcelona is the economic, cultural, and administrative capital of Catalonia, situated in the northeast of Spain, on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. The city covers a small area but has a large population: 100 square kilometers with about 1.6 million people in the city center and another 4 million in the suburbs. The city has 10 districts, but the areas in greatest demand among visitors, property investors, and expats are the oldest part, the Ciutat Vella, which is divided into four regions—La Ribera, also known as El Borne (or, locally, Born), to the north; Barrio Gótico, which is in the central Gothic quarter; El Raval to the south; and the seaside suburb of Barceloneta.

Cost Of Living In Barcelona

Further, this is one of the most affordable European cities of note, making it an ideal choice if you’re looking for an Old World cosmopolitan lifestyle on a budget. The cost of living in Barcelona is under €1,500 per month.

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Barcelona, Spain
Rent € 900  Unfurnished, two-bedroom apartment.
Gas € 80  For cooking.
Transportation € 80  Bus/metro pass for two, occasional taxi.
Electricity € 60  A/C usage.
Water € 20  
Telephone € 45  
Internet N/A  Bundled with phone.
Cable TV € 20  
Groceries € 400  Basic items for couple. 
Entertainment € 307  Social outing, 25-60 euros p/person
Total € 1,912  US$2,124

 

Expats In Barcelona

The expat community in Barcelona is huge and thriving. More than 150 nationalities live in Barcelona, a reflection of the Catalan peoples’ open and receptive character that foreigners find so attractive. There is a mix of working expats—employed by multinationals like HP, self-employed (running laptop-based or tourism-focused businesses), or running local businesses (everything from bars to playgroups and real estate companies)—and retirees.

Tourism In Barcelona

The Barrio Gótico is possibly Barcelona’s most touristy area. Historically, this was where the wealthy lived; however, when the Eixample was built in the 19th century, the wealth moved out and the area went downhill. Over the last 10 years, this area has become very popular and has undergone a revival, with the chic and trendy moving back in. It is an area of narrow streets, small apartments, and lots of tourists and, as well, all that intriguing ancient history.

Surprisingly are able to explore the city quickly and easily—Spain’s second biggest—because of its compact, well-laid-out design, yet there is so much to do and see. Fantastic art and architecture from pre-Roman to Modernista and current times is everywhere. There are galleries, monuments, theaters, restaurants, shopping—all the usual stuff of cities— yet there are also lots of parks and pretty plazas (plaças in Catalan, the language of this region), great beaches, and easy access to the beautiful Costa Brava to the north and the Costa Dorada to the south.

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Barcelona

Barcelona, Spain

The city of Barcelona is a vibrant, colorful, proud, interesting place that’s got the benefit of the passion of the Spanish combined with the efficiency and organization of the Catalans. The city’s energy continues today despite Spain’s economic woes. People live, work, and shop in most of the city neighborhoods and districts, so each has its own community spirit, and some even have their own fiestas.

Barcelona is the economic, cultural, and administrative capital of Catalonia, situated in the northeast of Spain, on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea. The city covers a small area but has a large population: 100 square kilometers with about 1.6 million people in the city center and another 4 million in the suburbs. The city has 10 districts, but the areas in greatest demand among visitors, property investors, and expats are the oldest part, the Ciutat Vella, which is divided into four regions—La Ribera, also known as El Borne (or, locally, Born), to the north; Barrio Gótico, which is in the central Gothic quarter; El Raval to the south; and the seaside suburb of Barceloneta.

Cost Of Living In Barcelona

Further, this is one of the most affordable European cities of note, making it an ideal choice if you’re looking for an Old World cosmopolitan lifestyle on a budget. The cost of living in Barcelona is under €1,500 per month.

Click here for currency conversion at today’s exchange rate.

Monthly Budget For A Couple Living In Barcelona, Spain
Rent € 900  Unfurnished, two-bedroom apartment.
Gas € 80  For cooking.
Transportation € 80  Bus/metro pass for two, occasional taxi.
Electricity € 60  A/C usage.
Water € 20  
Telephone € 45  
Internet N/A  Bundled with phone.
Cable TV € 20  
Groceries € 400  Basic items for couple. 
Entertainment € 307  Social outing, 25-60 euros p/person
Total € 1,912  US$2,124

 

Expats In Barcelona

The expat community in Barcelona is huge and thriving. More than 150 nationalities live in Barcelona, a reflection of the Catalan peoples’ open and receptive character that foreigners find so attractive. There is a mix of working expats—employed by multinationals like HP, self-employed (running laptop-based or tourism-focused businesses), or running local businesses (everything from bars to playgroups and real estate companies)—and retirees.

Tourism In Barcelona

The Barrio Gótico is possibly Barcelona’s most touristy area. Historically, this was where the wealthy lived; however, when the Eixample was built in the 19th century, the wealth moved out and the area went downhill. Over the last 10 years, this area has become very popular and has undergone a revival, with the chic and trendy moving back in. It is an area of narrow streets, small apartments, and lots of tourists and, as well, all that intriguing ancient history.

Surprisingly are able to explore the city quickly and easily—Spain’s second biggest—because of its compact, well-laid-out design, yet there is so much to do and see. Fantastic art and architecture from pre-Roman to Modernista and current times is everywhere. There are galleries, monuments, theaters, restaurants, shopping—all the usual stuff of cities— yet there are also lots of parks and pretty plazas (plaças in Catalan, the language of this region), great beaches, and easy access to the beautiful Costa Brava to the north and the Costa Dorada to the south.