Articles Related to Ecuador


You don't mind...or, if you do, you're not happy. If you're interested in a lifestyle supported by the diversions and distractions of a big city, Cayo is definitely not for you. If you're delighted by the thought of wide-open spaces where life revolves around the land and where independence and self-sufficiency are prized above all else, then Cayo could be the paradise you seek.

At home in Cayo, the view outside your bedroom window and from your front porch would be of fields and pastures, trees and jungle, rivers and livestock. You'd see Mennonites driving horse-drawn carts and children walking home from school. Everyone going about his or her business, not much bothered by market values, fiscal cliffs, or the mounting deficit. Here, in this land of escape, where life is simple, those things don't seem to matter or even to register.

Living in Cayo, you'd have Internet but maybe not reliable high-speed service. Don't move here if you plan to day trade.

Who Should Retire To Medellin, Colombia?

Medellin is a pretty, tidy city with a near-perfect climate. It's also culturally and recreationally rich and diverse in a sophisticated, developed-world kind of way. On any given day, you could visit a museum or see a tango show. There's opera in season, shopping year-round, and dance clubs, nightclubs, and white-glove restaurants...plus interactive outdoor museum-parks, an aquarium, an amusement park, botanical gardens, a planetarium, a "Barefoot Park" with a Zen garden, and dozens of small, neighborhood parks and treed plazas.

Medellin is an economic and financial center for Colombia, as well as a literary and an artistic one. It's the base for newspapers, radio networks, publishing houses, an annual poetry festival, an international jazz festival, an international tango festival, and an annual book fair. Back in 1971, Medellin was even the venue for Colombia's answer to Woodstock, the Festival de Ancon.

Medellin is a place where things work--the Internet, the metro, street-cleaning, garbage-collection...you can count on these services day-to-day. Taxis are metered, shop-keepers are well-mannered, and the people you pass on the street are well-dressed.

Making this a good choice for someone who wants city life but who also enjoys the out-of-doors (as this is a city best enjoyed al fresco). Medellin is suited to the retiree who isn't interested in hot, humid, or tropical and who appreciates Euro-chic but doesn't want to travel all the way to Europe.

The expat and retiree communities in Medellin are fledgling, meaning that you'd have to assimilate into the local one. This would mean speaking Spanish. If you don't already speak Spanish and don't want to learn, Medellin is probably not your ideal retirement haven.

Who Should Retire To Cuenca, Ecuador?

Cuenca is a colonial city where the cost of living is low and the cost of buying a home of your own is near rock-bottom. The health care is high quality, honest, and super-affordable. As in Medellin, the weather is "spring-like" year-round. Unlike Medellin (which is an emerging retirement haven rather than an established one like Cuenca), the city is home to one of the world's largest and fastest-growing communities of foreign retirees.

On the other hand, you have to remember that, charming as it can be, Cuenca is located in a poor, developing country. In this regard (and many others, too) Cuenca is the yang to Medellin's yin. In Cuenca, as throughout Ecuador, the standards of maintenance for roads, buildings, sidewalks, etc., won't be what you're probably used to and the hassle factor associated with any administrative task will be big.

Expats we know who are happy living in Cuenca are able to consider these annoyances fair exchange for the simple, 1950's lifestyle the city offers. Walking around town (Cuenca is a place where you could live comfortably without owning a car), you'll get to know the shop owners and your neighbors, who will all get to know you, too.

Cuenca will appeal to the expat who wants city life but who also has a sense of adventure and who is up for (rather than intimidated by) culture shock.

Who Should Retire To Puerto Vallarta, Mexico?

Romantic. That might be the best single word to describe Puerto Vallarta. The city also offers shopping and fine dining, boating and golfing, country clubs and community, gourmet shops and designer boutiques...all alongside a beautiful stretch of the Pacific Ocean.

Puerto Vallarta could be called glamorous, but the cost of living and of buying real estate here aren't jet-set. This is one of Mexico's most sophisticated resort spots, with more cachet than Mazatlán and more chic than Cancún. Walking around Vallarta, you get that happy, vacation-time feel that successful beach resorts exude.

And that's the would-be retiree overseas who should consider Puerto Vallarta--the beach-loving soul who likes the idea of retirement as a perpetual, fully appointed vacation.

Who Should Retire To El Cangrejo, Panama?

El Cangrejo is the expat hub of Panama City and a top choice for a comfortable, affordable, downtown-city-living experience. In El Cangrejo, you're smack-dab in the middle of everything Panama City has to offer.

This is one of the few neighborhoods in this city that is walkable and where you could get by without a car. It's also the only neighborhood in this city I'd describe as "cool." Over the years, El Cangrejo residents I've known have included a Chilean artist, a corporate transplant from Canada, many young Panamanians bucking the tradition of living with their parents through their 20s, retired hippies from the States, an entrepreneur from Serbia, and an Irish writer.

Panama City is the region's melting pot, and El Cangrejo is where the most interesting of the many transplants to this town choose to settle.

It's also Panama City's red-light district, the center of its prostitution (legal in this country) and casino trades. El Cangrejo's streets are lined with nightclubs and cafes, restaurants and pubs, plus low- and mid-rise apartment buildings. This isn't flashy Panama City (you find that in the high-rises along Avenida Balboa and in Punta Pacifico) and it isn't power Panama City (that's in Altos de Golf). El Cangrejo could be called the soul of this city, a good choice for the retiree with an open mind...

Who doesn't mind heat and humidity, congestion and traffic, noise and litter. These things, too, are all a part of the scene here.

Kathleen Peddicord

 

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Dear Live and Invest Overseas Reader, 

Where is the best place in the world to retire?

That's a tricky question to answer, so I suggest coming at this from a different angle. Rather than trying to identify the world's top retirement haven, consider instead who's best suited to retire where.

A short list of top retirement options in the Americas right now would include:
  • Cayo, Belize
  • Medellin, Colombia
  • Cuenca, Ecuador
  • Puerto Vallarta, Mexico
  • El Cangrejo, Panama

Which one of these places is the best choice? It depends on who you are.

Who Should Retire To Cayo, Belize?

Belize is a retirement, a tax, and an offshore haven. This is a sunny country where the folks speak English and value their freedom and privacy. Belize is easy to get to from the States, and the people living here are welcoming and hospitable once you've arrived.

On the other hand, this is a small country where the infrastructure is most kindly described as "developing."

The cost of living can be affordable, even low, but not if you want to live a more developed-world lifestyle that would mean buying lots of things not produced locally. Anything imported comes at an inflated price.

My favorite part of Belize is its Cayo District. No infrastructure, limited services and amenities, and little market demand could be interpreted as negatives, but, in Cayo, these things are a big part of the appeal. Once you get to Cayo, you don't mind that there's no infrastructure. You don't mind that the culture is more concerned with country living than consumerism.

You don't mind...or, if you do, you're not happy. If you're interested in a lifestyle supported by the diversions and distractions of a big city, Cayo is definitely not for you. If you're delighted by the thought of wide-open spaces where life revolves around the land and where independence and self-sufficiency are prized above all else, then Cayo could be the paradise you seek.

At home in Cayo, the view outside your bedroom window and from your front porch would be of fields and pastures, trees and jungle, rivers and livestock. You'd see Mennonites driving horse-drawn carts and children walking home from school. Everyone going about his or her business, not much bothered by market values, fiscal cliffs, or the mounting deficit. Here, in this land of escape, where life is simple, those things don't seem to matter or even to register.

Living in Cayo, you'd have Internet but maybe not reliable high-speed service. Don't move here if you plan to day trade.

Who Should Retire To Medellin, Colombia?

Medellin is a pretty, tidy city with a near-perfect climate. It's also culturally and recreationally rich and diverse in a sophisticated, developed-world kind of way. On any given day, you could visit a museum or see a tango show. There's opera in season, shopping year-round, and dance clubs, nightclubs, and white-glove restaurants...plus interactive outdoor museum-parks, an aquarium, an amusement park, botanical gardens, a planetarium, a "Barefoot Park" with a Zen garden, and dozens of small, neighborhood parks and treed plazas.

Medellin is an economic and financial center for Colombia, as well as a literary and an artistic one. It's the base for newspapers, radio networks, publishing houses, an annual poetry festival, an international jazz festival, an international tango festival, and an annual book fair. Back in 1971, Medellin was even the venue for Colombia's answer to Woodstock, the Festival de Ancon.

Medellin is a place where things work--the Internet, the metro, street-cleaning, garbage-collection...you can count on these services day-to-day. Taxis are metered, shop-keepers are well-mannered, and the people you pass on the street are well-dressed.

Making this a good choice for someone who wants city life but who also enjoys the out-of-doors (as this is a city best enjoyed al fresco). Medellin is suited to the retiree who isn't interested in hot, humid, or tropical and who appreciates Euro-chic but doesn't want to travel all the way to Europe.

The expat and retiree communities in Medellin are fledgling, meaning that you'd have to assimilate into the local one. This would mean speaking Spanish. If you don't already speak Spanish and don't want to learn, Medellin is probably not your ideal retirement haven.

Who Should Retire To Cuenca, Ecuador?

Cuenca is a colonial city where the cost of living is low and the cost of buying a home of your own is near rock-bottom. The health care is high quality, honest, and super-affordable. As in Medellin, the weather is "spring-like" year-round. Unlike Medellin (which is an emerging retirement haven rather than an established one like Cuenca), the city is home to one of the world's largest and fastest-growing communities of foreign retirees.

On the other hand, you have to remember that, charming as it can be, Cuenca is located in a poor, developing country. In this regard (and many others, too) Cuenca is the yang to Medellin's yin. In Cuenca, as throughout Ecuador, the standards of maintenance for roads, buildings, sidewalks, etc., won't be what you're probably used to and the hassle factor associated with any administrative task will be big.

Expats we know who are happy living in Cuenca are able to consider these annoyances fair exchange for the simple, 1950's lifestyle the city offers. Walking around town (Cuenca is a place where you could live comfortably without owning a car), you'll get to know the shop owners and your neighbors, who will all get to know you, too.

Cuenca will appeal to the expat who wants city life but who also has a sense of adventure and who is up for (rather than intimidated by) culture shock.

Who Should Retire To Puerto Vallarta, Mexico?

Romantic. That might be the best single word to describe Puerto Vallarta. The city also offers shopping and fine dining, boating and golfing, country clubs and community, gourmet shops and designer boutiques...all alongside a beautiful stretch of the Pacific Ocean.

Puerto Vallarta could be called glamorous, but the cost of living and of buying real estate here aren't jet-set. This is one of Mexico's most sophisticated resort spots, with more cachet than Mazatlán and more chic than Cancún. Walking around Vallarta, you get that happy, vacation-time feel that successful beach resorts exude.

And that's the would-be retiree overseas who should consider Puerto Vallarta--the beach-loving soul who likes the idea of retirement as a perpetual, fully appointed vacation.

Who Should Retire To El Cangrejo, Panama?

El Cangrejo is the expat hub of Panama City and a top choice for a comfortable, affordable, downtown-city-living experience. In El Cangrejo, you're smack-dab in the middle of everything Panama City has to offer.

This is one of the few neighborhoods in this city that is walkable and where you could get by without a car. It's also the only neighborhood in this city I'd describe as "cool." Over the years, El Cangrejo residents I've known have included a Chilean artist, a corporate transplant from Canada, many young Panamanians bucking the tradition of living with their parents through their 20s, retired hippies from the States, an entrepreneur from Serbia, and an Irish writer.

Panama City is the region's melting pot, and El Cangrejo is where the most interesting of the many transplants to this town choose to settle.

It's also Panama City's red-light district, the center of its prostitution (legal in this country) and casino trades. El Cangrejo's streets are lined with nightclubs and cafes, restaurants and pubs, plus low- and mid-rise apartment buildings. This isn't flashy Panama City (you find that in the high-rises along Avenida Balboa and in Punta Pacifico) and it isn't power Panama City (that's in Altos de Golf). El Cangrejo could be called the soul of this city, a good choice for the retiree with an open mind...

Who doesn't mind heat and humidity, congestion and traffic, noise and litter. These things, too, are all a part of the scene here.

Kathleen Peddicord
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Introduced to Latin America by the Spanish almost 500 years ago, the Pase del Niño is a Christmas celebration in which likenesses of the infant Jesus are carried through towns and villages. In Ecuador, the tradition remains strongest in the Andean region. Organizers of the Cuenca parade claim that theirs is the largest Pase del Niño in all of Latin America; as many as 50,000 will participate in the procession, with about 200,000 more watching from sidewalks, balconies and rooftops.

The parade is actually a collection of hundreds of smaller parades, according to José Washington Noroña, one of the event's organizers. "Every neighborhood and nearby town will have its own parade with its own entries. Each will carry its own statue of the Christ child. This is something that communities plan for the entire year. Although most entries are from Cuenca and the surrounding area, some come from as far away as Loja in the south, as well as Otavalo and Ibarra in the north," says Noroña.

Although the Christmas Eve parade may be the main event, the Pase del Niño celebration is a three-month-long activity, beginning the first Sunday after Advent and continuing until Carnival in February. The tradition also includes Novenas, nine consecutive nights of song, food, and prayer, celebrated in homes and churches. On Christmas Eve, the Misa del Gallo, or Rooster Mass, is celebrated in the Cathedral and local churches. Besides Pase del Niño celebrations, Christmas in Cuenca also features nightly firework shows, concerts and craft sales.

Organizers say that the parade has a strong connection to the United States. Ecuadorians who live in the U.S. are major financial contributors, says Noroña. "Those who have done well there send money as thanks for their safe passage and future success.""

The U.S influence is evident in many of the parade entries. Children wear cowboy outfits and such personalities as Bart Simpson and Richard Nixon, dressed up as Santa Claus, have made parade appearances. No matter the origin of the characters, Noroña says that the organizers try to keep the focus religious. "We don't dictate what participants can do, but we try to keep the focus on the birth of Christ. Last year, I saw a man dressed as Sponge Bob and thought he was a little out of place."

The centerpiece of Cuenca's parade is an 1823 sculpture of the infant Jesus that was commissioned by Cuencano Josefa Heredia from an unknown local artist. When the sculpture came into the possession of Cuenca Monsignor Miguel Cordero Crespo more than a century later, he took it to the Holy Land and Rome in 1961, where it was blessed by Pope John XXIII. After the journey and the anointment, the statute became known as Niño Viajero, or Traveling Child, and has been the parade's main attraction ever since.

The parade begins at Iglesia Corazón de Jesus on Calle Gran Colombia at about 10 a.m. on Christmas Eve and continues well into the afternoon. It winds its way down Calle Simon Bolivar, ending a few blocks east of Parque Calderon.

Along the parade route and in nearby parks and plazas, hundreds of vendors sell traditional foods, cotton candy, ice cream, and candy. There are also several distribution points for chicha, a traditional holiday beverage. It's free, but beware: the alcohol content is high.

Although the sidewalks and balconies around Parque Calderon are considered prime parade-viewing areas, anywhere along Simon Bolivar will provide a good vantage point. The best looks are probably from the upper-floor balconies of homes and businesses along Bolivar.

David Morrill

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“A property transaction can be like a Mexican stand-off. I’ve actually seen guns on the table during closings. That’s extreme, but you don’t want to make the final exchange until you are absolutely sure everything has been done as you expected and wanted. 

“Finally, we do now, finally, have escrow in this market, handled through fiduciaries. You can earn 6% interest on your money in escrow. 

“The coastal property market, where I’m focused, like all property markets in Ecuador, is all over the place, from cute and quaint to fantastic; from modest to marvelous. You could choose a small detached house near the beach or a mansion in Playas. There are condos, built homes for resale, and lots. 

“If you want something like what you’re used to in U.S. coastal markets, Samborondon is for you. This is the Beverly Hills of Ecuador’s coast, with all the U.S.-like amenities you might want. Price range here is US$200,000 for a home to US$2 million for something akin to a mansion. 

“Plaza Lagos is for golfers. Golf course homes here about 30 minutes from Guayaquil start at US$259,000. You’ll have the courses to yourself during the week; they’re really only ever used on weekends. 

“Playas is this coast’s hidden gem. Used to be the poor man’s beach. It’s nearest to Guayaquil, the sunniest beach for sure, wide and sandy, with no rocks. It’s also extensive, 14 or 15 kilometers in length, meaning plenty of room to get away from the crowds. By comparison, the ‘resort beach’ of Salinas is much narrower and only a kilometer long. It gets crowded, busy, and, for me, not enjoyable. 

“I think of Salinas as Little Miami without the crime. This horseshoe bay is the most developed beach in the country with the best swimming and foot-high waves. The downside (for me) is that the beach is completely surrounded by towers. These are vacation homes, not residences, making this a good (I’d say the best) place to invest for rental. You could buy a condo next to the beach and the marina for US$70,000. Great rental play. 

“Lobster Bay is tranquil and scenic, another horseshoe bay, and my favorite place to go for a lobster lunch. The mom-and-pop restaurants serve fresh-caught lobster feasts for US$8 to US$10, including beer. This is also a great spot for fishing, and the bay is always filled with fishing boats. 

“Wherever you decide to buy, you should be prepared for the fact that many houses here are sold furnished. If you don’t want the furniture, here’s a suggestion: Find out who you could donate it to. Go to the church or the community center and find out which family or families need what you have. You will be a hero and an instantly valued and respected member of your new community.” 

Kaitlin Yent 

Editor’s Note: Mike Sager’s talk at last week’s Live and Invest in Ecuador Conference on this country’s best current coastal property buys, both for investment and for personal use, was recorded...along with every other presentation of this event, 23 in total.

This bundle of resources will be available soon as our all-new Live and Invest in Ecuador Home Conference KitToday, though, you can purchase the complete kit pre-release and save more than 50%.

Go here to do that now.

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“I was downsized, and I had a baby on the way, so I went into the army. After two years I was offered a better suit job in the army intelligence, and actually got to wear a suit. Then I was a military instructor, until a training accident. At that point, I went into marketing and business management. I did really well, made a ton of money, and hated it.

“I moved my family to California, became a hospital administrator, and got sick quick of calls about gang fights in my hospital.

“Then my wife came to me one day with an idea. ‘You haven’t been happy with your job, we haven’t been happy in California, and the girls aren’t happy in school,’ she began.

“She went on and on (as women can do...and I’m allowed to say that after two wives and three daughters), citing all the reasons, in great detail, why our life wasn’t what we wanted it to be.

“Finally, she got to the point. She wanted to sell everything and move to Ecuador. 

“So we did. Within six months of my wife suggesting the idea. Crazy, right? But that’s the truth. That’s the story. We moved our entire family to a new country based on my wife’s whim. Within a year of that day when she laid out her plan, our lives had made a 180.

“And I’m here today to tell you that it was the best thing we ever could have done. We got jobs here in Ecuador within 24 hours of landing—my wife as an English teacher and me teaching English, as well, but to military personnel.

“Growing in our back yard today are coconut trees, banana trees, mango trees, and almond trees. When we want breakfast, we go forage in the yard.

“We’re renting our house in Guayaquil for US$720 a month. It’s a nice house with that great yard. When my daughters’ school wanted to throw a party for 120 people, they asked if they could use our house. That’s how big it is, for that price.

“I have no car. A bus ride is 25 cents. I wouldn’t dream of driving here. That’s most residents’ biggest complaint about the city.

“Something you should know about taking the bus, though. A bus won’t stop for a guy. If you’re a guy, you have to prove your macho-ness every time you take a bus ride. You have to kind of jump on and hang off. They do slow down...slightly. But, I’m not kidding, you have to jump and grab on as they pass.

“Don’t worry, ladies. The drivers will stop for you. They wouldn’t dream of insulting you by making you hop or run. I have to say I’m jealous of this. I wish I didn’t have to prove how much of a man I am every time I want to take the bus!

“The locals like to rent to North Americans because we pay our rent. They want you as a tenant, so they’re willing to work with you, for instance on repairs.

“What else can I tell you about living here? Ah, the Año Viejo Doll...

“On every street corner in every city, for the month or so before New Year’s Eve, you’ll see a hollow doll. You’re meant to drop a dollar or whatever into the doll every time you pass by. On Dec. 30, each city empties the dolls and uses the money collected for the local New Year’s Eve party. Then they fill the dolls with every kind of combustible they can find and, at Midnight, they blow them all up all at once. Imagine it. On every single street corner in every city, these dolls are blowing up. You can’t hear or see anything until well past 1 a.m.

“On Jan. 1st, Guayaquil airport is closed. No flights in or out, because the city looks like a battle field from the sky...”

Much, much more to come on living, retiring, and investing in Ecuador, live from the scene...

Kathleen Peddicord

P.S. As always, we recorded every presentation of last week’s three-day Live and Invest in Ecuador event (including Richard Evans' presentation to the group on why he and his family chose to relocate from California to Guayaquil and how they’ve reinvented their lives into a grand adventure as a result).

All of these recordings are now being edited. When that work is complete, our all-new Live and Invest in Ecuador Home Conference Kit will be available for purchase. Meantime, you can buy a copy pre-release and save more than 50%. Go here now for details.

 

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“My friends were little Mexican kids. I ate at their houses. We had beans and rice every day, and I loved it. By the time I was 20, I realized that I identified more with Latin America than North. 

“I have lived in Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador,” Mike continued. “I never made a lot of friends in the first two countries, frankly, but, as soon as my feet hit the ground in Ecuador, I was making friends—real friends. I intend this with the most love, but I’ve gotta’ say, if I had a Tico friend, he wanted something from me. Not so here in Ecuador...” 

Mike went on to give the group a glimpse of his new life on the Ecuadorean coast. 

“I live in San Jose, near Salinas,” he explained. “And I’m telling you, for real, you can live in this part of this country on US$500 to US$750 a month. If you like the outdoors, you’ve got everything you could possibly want on your doorstep, beach and mountains...and all for free—watersports, surfing, hiking... 

“I wake up every day on my little beach, in my little beach house, with my wife and my new family, and I have to pinch myself. We have about 300 sunny days a year, at least. I’m living now for the day-to-day. As far as I’m concerned, I’ve already realized every dream I’ve ever had about what life should be. That’s what Ecuador has meant for me. 

“Business is good, but, if it’s not, I’m not too worried. I have my guitar, my hammock, my beach, my beer, and my family. I haven’t a care. 

“I should tell you about my hammock,” Mike continued. “It’s the ultimate stress reliever. You don’t need therapy. You don’t need massages. You just need a hammock. You can pick one up here for US$10 or less. Add another US$1 for a cold beer, make sure to have your hammock strung up by sunset, and I guarantee you’ll never feel anxiety again. 

“And that’s the real point I’d like to leave with you today. Give up on anxiety. Just walk away from it. It’s time to enjoy your life. We’ve all, all of us in this room, paid our dues. It’s time to do what makes you happy. If that’s in Ecuador, then you should just jump in with both feet. Don’t let anything hold you back or keep you from realizing the life you deserve.” 

Mike took a survey of those in the room. “Who here is into motorcycles?” he asked. A flurry of hands went up. 

Then: 

“Any musicians?” Another show of hands. 

“Awesome!” Mike said. “That’s what I need. I need motorcycle enthusiasts for friends and people to play with me in my band. I’m trying to do less of this,” he said, waving his arms to indicate the conference room, “and more of that,” he concluded, pointing to photos on the screen of his motorcycle and his band. 

“I’m in love with my life here,” Mike went on. “You’ve figured that out by now. I have to say, though, that probably what I love most is the cost of living. It’s so low that it opens many doors. 

“My family and I take three to five amazing vacations a year, usually to Europe, sometimes to Disney World, Argentina, wherever. I could never have spent thousands of dollars on a vacation before moving here, but now we’re always planning the next trip. 

“And, really, even when we’re at home, it’s like being on vacation. This country has many great hidden treasures, some very simple and unassuming. One of my favorites is a restaurant, a shack, right on the beach. For US$3 you get a whole, grilled, fresh-caught fish, rice, beer,patacones, and a grilled banana dessert. And you eat it all right on the beach, with the surf a few feet away.” 

Mike filled his time describing the lifestyle he’s enjoying living on Ecuador’s coast. Attendees, though, wanted to know about real estate and investment opportunities, too. When the time came for questions, one attendee asked, specifically, “Where are the hot spots for beachfront property investment? Where should I be looking not as much for a new life at the beach as for a chance to make money in beachfront property?” 

“Playas,” Mike replied. “This is the hottest coastal real estate market right now,” he added. “It’s the nearest beach to Guayaquil, and lots of money is flowing from Guayaquil to Playas. 

“Salinas is where I’d shop for a rental investment,” Mike continued. 

“Also interesting is Olon,” he added. “This is the most desirable beach in Ecuador among the locals. I call Olon the Malibu beach of Ecuador. There are five different fishing villages along this coast, no high-rises, and it’s next-door to a party and surfing capital. Many different lifestyle and recreation options all rolled into one...” 

Kaitlin Yent 

P.S. “Real friendships start at events like this one,” Mike reminded the group this morning before leaving the stage. “Take advantage,” he advised. 

For me, that has been the best part of the experience this week—all the people I’ve met. I’ve attended many conferences in the past, and I have to say that the group here is especially friendly and fun. There are many repeat attendees here—readers who I’ve met at previous events in past years. 

“Your parents do an excellent job of getting information together in one easy place,” a couple of these frequent conference-goers told me when we spoke. 

“We’re not the typical expats,” the husband continued. “I left the United States in 1990 for Brazil, and my wife is Brazilian. We tried to go back in 1999 for our son’s education, but I couldn’t do it, and we left again. We are adventurers. 

“We take your mom’s advice as inspiration, then we go and explore for ourselves to draw our own conclusions. We’ve been to the Medellin conference and the Panama conference and now we’re here in Ecuador, and we have loved every one of these events as a starting point for information and ideas. 

“By the way, you need to tell your mom about indigenous town Saraguro, in Loja, southern Ecuador. It may not be a place to relocate to, but boy what a place to visit!” 

Editor’s Note: Kaitlin has promised to continue her from-the-scene reporting through the weekend. Stay tuned for more soon.

Meantime, our team in Guayaquil is recording every speaker’s presentation throughout the three days of the event, 23 in total. This bundle of resources will be available as our all-new Live and Invest in Ecuador Home Conference Kit as soon as the recordings have been edited. Today, though, you can purchase the complete kit pre-release and save more than 50%.

Go here to do that now.

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Kathleen Peddicord

Kathleen Peddicord is the founder of the Live and Invest Overseas publishing group. With more than 25 years experience covering this beat, Kathleen reports daily on current opportunities for living, retiring, and investing overseas in her free e-letter.

Her book, How To Retire Overseas—Everything You Need To Know To Live Well Abroad For Less, was recently released by Penguin Books.

Read more here.

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