Articles Related to Ecuador

Both Medellin and Cuenca enjoy great weather, with virtually no bugs, year-round. I didn't use heat or air conditioning in Cuenca, and I don't use them here in Medellin. 

But the weather is not the same. Medellin is warmer, with daily highs averaging around 81 degrees Fahrenheit (27 Celsius), with lows in the 60s, and one degree of seasonal variation. In Cuenca, monthly average highs vary from 65 to 71 degrees Fahrenheit (18 to 22 Celsius), depending on the time of year, and nightly lows are also correspondingly lower. I never broke a sweat in Cuenca, and I wore a long-sleeved shirt with no jacket almost every day of the year. 

Rainfall is great in Medellin (66 inches versus 35 inches in Cuenca), but the average sunny day is just a bit higher in Medellin. 

The city with the "perfect weather" for you will be a matter of your own taste.

Establishing residency is fairly easy in both Colombia and Ecuador, with low thresholds for visa qualification in both countries. In Colombia, the pensioner's visa requires an income of a little less than US$1,000 per month, while in Ecuador the level is even lower, at US$800 monthly. For an investor-type visa, Colombia's options start at around US$34,000 for a one-year temporary visa, while Ecuador requires US$25,000 for full, permanent residency.

So Ecuador has lower thresholds for permanent residency, both for the investor and the retiree.

Colombia's visa, however, is quicker and easier to obtain, with fewer required documents. Also, Ecuador imposes restrictions on being out of the country during your first two years of residency, while Colombia has no such restrictions. 

The cultural scene in Medellin is remarkably similar to that in Cuenca. This is surprising because Cuenca has around 600,000 people in its metro area, while Medellin has about 4 million. In both cities, you can enjoy orchestra, theater, art openings, museums, and a generally sophisticated cultural scene. You'll pay a fee for most of these in Medellin, while in Cuenca they're usually free. 

The infrastructure is good in both cities. You'll enjoy drinkable water, reliable broadband Internet, and dependable electricity, water, and phone service. 

Also, both cities are very walkable, and both have excellent and cheap public transit systems. If you decide to drive, you'll find traffic jams equally maddening in both cities. 

Real estate costs are cheap in both cities by Latin American standards. Right now, though, thanks to the current exchange rate between the Colombian peso and the U.S. dollar, prices in Medellin are cheaper than ever. I prepared a survey recently that compared costs in 18 Latin American cities, including Medellin, Montevideo (Uruguay), Fortaleza (Brazil), Panama City, and Cuenca. For comparable properties and areas, prices in Medellin's El Poblado are the lowest on a per-square-meter basis. A year ago, this was not the case. A year ago, Cuenca would have been more affordable. Today, Medellin is the better buy... not only than Cuenca but also than nearly every other destination I looked at in my survey. The only more affordable choices are Granada, Nicaragua; Santa Cruz, Bolivia; and Arequipa, Peru. 

For the lifestyle you'll enjoy in Medellin, the real estate is a tremendous bargain. And the same is true in Cuenca; for the lifestyle it offers, it, too, is a tremendous bargain.

But the lifestyle in one is nothing like the lifestyle in the other, which brings us to the ways these cities differ. (As Medellin is such a large and diverse city, I'll focus on its El Poblado neighborhood for my comparisons.)

Medellin's El Poblado offers a modern, upscale ambiance. It has elegant shopping, spotless infrastructure, glistening new buildings, and more fine dining than you can imagine. New luxury brick high-rises look down from lush, wooded hillsides. Tall trees line the well-maintained streets. And El Poblado is only one of many desirable areas in this city.

On the other hand, Cuenca is one of the Americas' premier Spanish-colonial cities and a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The old cathedral was built in 1557, the historic architecture is well preserved, and the streets are cobblestoned. You'll even see evidence of the Inca occupation from the early 1500s. Yet just outside the historic center, Cuenca also offers new, modern high-rises. So you could live in a modern home, yet have the historic center within walking distance. 

El Poblado is a First World environment; you'll be hard-pressed to find a U.S. city that can beat it. Cuenca is part of a developing country with some Third World characteristics like poor sidewalk and building maintenance. 

Access to the States is easier from Medellin than from Cuenca. Medellin has daily nonstops to Miami, while you'll need to connect (and possibly spend the night) in Guayaquil or Quito when traveling to and from Cuenca. This adds a day to the trip, as well as the cost of lodging and taxis. 

The expat community is far smaller in Medellin than in Cuenca. I can find expats in Medellin—at a local coffee shop or the Irish pub—if I look for them, and a couple of Americans are signed up at my gym. Otherwise, I don't see them around.

In Cuenca, the expat community is big, estimated between 4,000 and 5,000 people. These folks are making a cultural imprint on the city. I'd say that impact is positive. Since the infusion of North Americans to this city, there's been an explosion in the number of nice cafes, restaurants, and book shops, as well as other expat-owned services and businesses. Today in Cuenca, you can find most anything you might be looking for and, normally, an English-speaker to deal with in the process.

But whether an expat community of that size is a positive or a negative for you is a matter of choice. 

The cost of living is higher in El Poblado than in Cuenca but not much higher thanks, again, to the current exchange rate.

The basics in Medellin (food, entertainment, utilities, public transit, taxes, and HOA fees) cost me about US$1,500 per month right now. I believe in Cuenca the total cost would be about US$1,250 for the same lifestyle. Many people live for less than that in Cuenca, but I'm using an apples-to-apples comparison from my own experience.

Bottom line, neither city is expensive, but Cuenca is less expensive than Medellin. 

Which is the better retire-overseas choice?

Impossible to say. Manhattan is not inherently better or worse than New Orleans, after all... but it's a lot different. And the same goes for Medellin and Cuenca.

I see Ecuador as a cultural adventure where life is as different as you can get from the United States or Canada, short of moving to Asia. When I retired to Cuenca at age 49, I shunned places like Medellin, Chile, and Uruguay, because they were too much like the States. I wanted something as different, enriching, and exciting as I could get, and Cuenca fit the bill. 

Today, I think of Medellin as a way to reward myself. It's a treat to be here. Medellin is a way to enjoy perfect weather and an elegant lifestyle that I couldn't afford in the United States. When I bought my place in Medellin 10 years after I'd left the States, at the age of 59, it was exactly what I was looking for at that stage. I wanted an elegant, luxury lifestyle at an affordable price, and Medellin fit the bill. 

And that's the real reason that Medellin is now my "ideal retirement spot"... when it used to be Cuenca. 

You've heard a dozen times that the "perfect retirement location" is different for everyone. But there's more to it than that. Your "perfect spot" can also change with your taste, your age, and your experience living abroad. And that's really part of the fun.

This living overseas thing is an adventure and a journey of discovery that need never stop.

Lee Harrison

P.S. What else this week?
  • Global Investing Expert Lief Simon analyzes what Greece's new anti-austerity government means for the Greek property market:
“The only reasons to get into the Greek property market today are speculation or an interest in residency in this country. When prices do eventually bottom out, whenever that turns out to be, I can't imagine any compelling reason for them to appreciate again anytime in the near term...”
  • Lee Harrison gives 12 reasons to get into global property investing:
“Like me, many people today are combining a number of these agendas. That is, your vacation home, income property, and international investment can also be your future retirement home, earning a good income now while giving you an international presence and increasing in value until your retirement...”
  • Asian Correspondent Wendy Justice explores the attractions and culture in Japan:
“We saw a surprising number of traditionally dressed people in Japan. It was common to see people of both sexes wearing kimonos. In Kyoto, we saw geishas, beautifully adorned in full face makeup, ornate headdresses, and stunning costumes. At the Shinto temples, parents dressed their young children in kimonos and gave thanks to the gods for making them grow and be healthy...”
  • Lauren Brown and Jason Richter explain why Medellin, Colombia, is not only a top choice for retirees but also for expats, entrepreneurs, and investors of all ages:
“The expat and excursion groups and the many social media pages dedicated to social, cultural, and business needs and networking make itfun and easy to become involved and connected...”

Plus, From Lee Harrison This Week:

I've bought a number of overseas properties—both for personal use and as investments—and I find that evaluation of a potential purchase always comes back to a few simple basics. It's a safe and secure process when you follow the rules and use the same good sense that you'd use in your home country.

Specifically, for any property you're considering buying overseas, I recommend you ask yourself these four questions:

#1: Is the location good? As anyone in the real estate business will tell you, location is paramount. You can fix almost anything else with enough time and money, but you can't fix the location. Make sure it's either good or that you have a strong reason to believe it's on its way to becoming good.

In addition to the neighborhood, also consider the distance to the airport and to good medical facilities. 

#2: Would you need to own a car? This is an important question not only for you if you intend to use the property personally but also in the contexts of resale and rental. The ability to walk to stores, restaurants, and administrative services, meaning you don't have to invest in owning a car if you don't want to, makes life more convenient and also more affordable. In the case of a city property, it's not necessary that it be completely walkable; being near convenient public transit is the next-best alternative. Of course, walkability doesn't apply in remote properties that are intended to “get away from it all.”

#3: What's going on next-door? In Santa Marta, Colombia, I looked at a beautiful new high-rise apartment three blocks from the beach with an impressive view of the Caribbean. When I looked out the window, I happened to notice that the adjacent “never-to-be-developed” property was filled with construction equipment. As it turned out, this undisclosed neighboring building was going to block most of the view I'd have been paying for. 

Just south of João Pessoa, Brazil, we looked at a planned community of beautiful town homes a couple of blocks in from the beach. While driving to the property, I happened to notice a billboard announcing the construction of a massive low-income housing project on the adjacent property... again, undisclosed. 

You can't see into the future, and you can't know everything that will happen. But do keep your eyes open to what's going on in the area around you.

#4: In which direction is the Path of Progress moving? Take a big-picture look at any major infrastructure upgrades in the works. If you're a Path of Progress investor, you'll benefit from construction of that new highway or airport. If, on the other hand, you're looking for continued peace and solitude, you'll want to avoid them. Either way, you should consider them.

If you're buying into an existing building, you should also consider the following four questions:

#5: What is the condition of the property overall? Look at paint, general appearance, the pool, grounds, elevators, and facilities. A quality, well-managed building is never in rundown condition. I've heard plenty of excuses about how the homeowners association (HOA) was going to fix things up during the coming year... but a well-managed property doesn't become rundown in the first place.

#6: How strong is the HOA? We all know that HOAs are an annoyance. However, there's no doubt that they preserve the value of your investment. Make sure the rules for appearance and maintenance are being followed and that the HOA is well-funded by reviewing their financial statements (your real estate agent can get these for you). Compare the HOA fees to those for other facilities in the area to make sure they're not exorbitant but are sufficient. 

I looked at several properties in Montevideo, Uruguay, where the agent proudly told me that the HOA had been disbanded to save money and that future assessments would be made to take care of any building needs. I called these “dying buildings” because they were rapidly turning into poorly maintained, shabby properties. 

See if the HOA documents allow—or prohibit—short-term rentals. Many municipalities place restrictions on them. If you want to be able to rent your place out for maximum return, this is a problem. If, on the other hand, you intend to use the property as your residence, then no short-term rentals in the building is a good thing.

#7: How many units are for sale? If a mature building has a seemingly large number of units for sale, it could be a sign of trouble—a big tax increase, an HOA fee increase, or something unpleasant going on in the neighborhood, like a shopping center being built next-door. Ask around to find out why so many units are being offered for sale. The best source of reliable information on this can be the building's doormen. 

#8: What kinds of cars are in the parking garage? This may sound strange, but a building with well-off owners who care about the property will likely have a garage full of nice, well-kept cars. The more expensive they are, the better. If you see old junkers in the parking garage, take it as a warning.

If you're buying in a planned community, consider these four questions:

#9: How many unsold units remain? We were looking into property for sale last week in Mazatlán, Mexico, and found a large, brand-new apartment for sale—with an almost 180-degree ocean view—at a good price. But then we noticed that there was another just like it... and then found two more. After checking the building's completion date, I found it was completed almost four years ago.

Something's wrong here, something I can't see by investigating online. I'm traveling to see the area and property next month, and I'll figure it out. But if you see a large number of still-unsold units in a finished building, you should smell a rat. 

#10: How is infrastructure being funded? Many planned communities depend on property sales to fund the promised infrastructure and community amenities. This can mean that, if sales are insufficient, infrastructure and amenities never get finished, leaving owners holding the bag with unfulfilled sales promises on unimproved land.

I won't tell you to avoid sales-funded developments full stop. However, if the developer needs sales to fulfill his promises, that's an item that should be in your “risk” column.

The golden rule here is to “buy what you see.” This is an oversimplified way of verifying that, if the project were to stop today, leaving the remaining sales promises unfulfilled, you'd still own something that you believe to be of value. 

#11: What is the competition in the area? I once looked at a project in Uruguay that was 2.5 miles from the beach, practically requiring its residents to have a car—call it Project A. The houses were expensive by local standards, between US$250,000 and US$450,000. Project B, in the same town, was located right on the water, offering brand-new apartments for US$75,000, with plenty of unsold units. 

The town became popular with expats—partly due to Project A's promotional efforts—but almost everyone opted for cheaper and more convenient properties in Project B or elsewhere in town. Local competition wasn't the only reason Project A failed, but it was an important factor.

#12: Can the developer deliver what he's promising? I've written about this in detail in the past. Take a look here: 10 Questions To Ask Before Investing With A Developer Overseas.

Buying property in another country can be safe, rewarding, and profitable. Just be sure to follow the rules and apply the same common-sense behavior you would back home.

I'll be at the Global Property Summit starting March 18 in Panama City, co-hosting with Lief Simon. Along with a lot of actionable overseas opportunities, our group of experts will be covering all the tricks of the trade when it comes to buying properties abroad. You can get more information on the Global Property Summit here.

 

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The parade is actually a collection of hundreds of smaller parades, according to José Washington Noroña, one of the event's organizers. "Every neighborhood and nearby town will have its own parade with its own entries. Each will carry its own statue of the Christ child. This is something that communities plan for the entire year. Although most entries are from Cuenca and the surrounding area, some come from as far away as Loja in the south, as well as Otavalo and Ibarra in the north," says Noroña.

Although the Christmas Eve parade may be the main event, the Paseo del Niño celebration is a three-month-long activity, beginning the first Sunday after Advent and continuing until Carnaval in February. The tradition also includes Novenas, nine consecutive nights of song, food, and prayer, celebrated in homes and churches. On Christmas Eve, the Misa del Gallo, or Rooster Mass, is celebrated in the Cathedral and local churches. Besides Paseo del Niño celebrations, Christmas in Cuenca also features nightly firework shows, concerts, and craft sales.

Organizers say that the parade has a strong connection to the United States. Ecuadorians who live in the United States are major financial contributors, says Noroña. "Those who have done well there send money as thanks for their safe passage and future success."

The U.S. influence is evident in many of the parade entries. Children wear cowboy outfits and such personalities as Bart Simpson and Richard Nixon, dressed up as Santa Claus, have made parade appearances. No matter the origin of the characters, Noroña says that the organizers try to keep the focus religious. "We don't dictate what participants can do, but we try to keep the focus on the birth of Christ. Last year, I saw a man dressed as SpongeBob and thought he was a little out of place."

The centerpiece of Cuenca's parade is an 1823 sculpture of the infant Jesus that was commissioned by Cuencano Josefa Heredia from an unknown local artist. When the sculpture came into the possession of Cuenca Monsignor Miguel Cordero Crespo more than a century later, he took it to the Holy Land and Rome in 1961, where it was blessed by Pope John XXIII. After the journey and the anointment, the statute became known as Niño Viajero, or Traveling Child, and has been the parade's main attraction ever since.

The parade begins at Iglesia Corazón de Jesus on Calle Gran Colombia at about 10 a.m. on Christmas Eve and continues well into the afternoon. It winds its way down Calle Simon Bolivar, ending a few blocks east of Parque Calderon.

Along the parade route and in nearby parks and plazas, hundreds of vendors sell traditional foods, cotton candy, ice cream, and candy. There are also several distribution points for chicha, a traditional holiday beverage. It's free, but beware: The alcohol content is high.

Although the sidewalks and balconies around Parque Calderon are considered prime parade-viewing areas, anywhere along Simon Bolivar will provide a good vantage point. The best looks are probably from the upper-floor balconies of homes and businesses along Bolivar.

David Morrill

Continue Reading:Teaching English As A Foreign Language In Panama
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My favorite part of Salinas is Chipipe, close to the naval base. It draws a quieter crowd and, because it's at the end of the beach areas, sees less traffic than elsewhere in Salinas. The beaches are wider and nicer than anywhere else in town, and just a couple of blocks in from the beach is a pleasant downtown area with fine old homes and lower property prices. 

Salinas is famous for sport fishing and holds a number of world records for sailfish, tuna, and black marlin. The year's best weather starts in November, with sunny skies and pleasant temperatures. February through April, this weather gives way to sunny mornings with showers in the afternoons, still quite pleasant. April through November, it's often cool, dry, and overcast. If you burn easily, you might like it; if you crave sunshine, you won't.

But Salinas benefits from the school schedule in Cuenca. The kids are out of school in Cuenca in June and July, and that's when a lot of families go on vacation. So there's a demand for vacation rentals during the time of year with the least-pleasant weather.

This is good news for North American investors, who can escape their winter to enjoy Salinas' best weather and also enjoy local rental demand during the off season.

Bottom line, what makes Salinas such an appealing property-purchase location is the low cost. Here are examples of properties currently on the market:

  • A two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo in an older, well-maintained building near the beach, with 100 square meters of living space. The unit has a kitchen with new cabinets, a living-dining area with built-in seating, a laundry room, and a bonus room that could serve as a maid's quarters, an office, or a third bedroom. The unit is a walk-up on the third floor. The asking price is just US$40,000.
  • Another condo is less than 2 years old and located in a complex with direct beach access in a residential area of Salinas, just a short drive from the malecón entertainment zone. (In this part of Latin America, the malecón is the beachfront road or often a boardwalk.) The complex has a gym, pools, social area, sauna, and 24-hour guard. The living area is 70 square meters and includes two bedrooms, two baths, laundry, Internet, and DirecTV. The complex has parking, a pool, and a social area. This property is on offer for US$90,000 furnished.
  • Located in a quiet beachside community about 10 miles north of Salinas, with tranquil beaches and within easy driving distance to entertainment and amenities, is a 117-square-meter condo with three bedrooms, three baths, a kitchen, a living-dining area, and a large terrace with a Jacuzzi. From its hilltop location, this condo offers panoramic ocean views. The complex has parking, a pool, and a social area. Furnishings are included in the list price of US$125,000.
  • A large, 300-square-meter condo with two master suites is located on the 10th floor of a well-located building on the malecón of Salinas and has amazing views. There are three large bedrooms, three baths, a huge living room and dining room, and an oversized terrace. The views from the terrace are incredible due to the high floor location. The owner says you can see north up the coast to Manta (87 miles away) on a clear day. The beach is right across the street, and stores, bars, restaurants, and pharmacies are also right outside. The asking price is US$150,000.
  • With ocean views from the center of the beach district is a four-bedroom, four-bath oceanfront condo with a large balcony. With 160 square meters of living area, this condo comes fully furnished and move-in ready for the asking price of just US$115,000.


I recommend Salinas as your best coastal choice in Ecuador if you're interested in a place where you could live part time and rent your place out when you're not there. You'd enjoy great weather during the North American winter and rental traffic during North America's summer. 

And, again, you can position yourself here right now for as little as US$40,000.

Lee Harrison

Editor's Note: Lee Harrison, our Overseas Property Alert editor, will be revealing all of his current top global property investing recommendations at our 2015 Global Property Summit.

Registration for this once-a-year event will open within the next 24 hours.Go here now (this is your last chance) to get your name on the pre-registration list to enjoy VIP attendee status and perks

Continue reading: Funding Your Retirement With Cash Flow From Rental Property Investments Overseas

 

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This is where you might expect a hard-luck story, but we don't have one. We walked away from Dubai willingly. Purposefully. The bank didn't foreclose on our home. We weren't downsized. We didn't lose our retirement nest egg to nefarious Wall Street bankers or bad investment decisions. We moved because we wanted more out of life than Starbucks-filled shopping malls.

Some told us we were crazy to "retire" to Ecuador at the age of 44, and, looking solely at the numbers, they had a point. They didn't get it and probably never will because our departure from Dubai was not about money. If money were our priority, we'd still be living in Dubai. In Dubai, everything looked great on paper, but, in reality, we were experiencing a steady decline in the quality of our lives with no end in sight.

During a trip to Ecuador, we saw an opportunity to reverse that trend. And reverse it we did, agreeing to buy our current home five minutes after seeing it on our first day ever in South America. Carpe diem! We hadn't even seen the nearby town of Vilcabamba yet. FYI, it's not a strategy I recommend for everyone.

With the deed to our nearly 2 acres of "dream come true" property firmly in hand, the decision to walk away from Dubai was easier to make. So, one year later, we put aside a life of much in Dubai for a life of so much more here near Vilcabamba, and we have never looked back.

While you may be considering Ecuador for its lower cost of living, we saw a chance to live in a place that is remarkably beautiful and where the weather is just the best. So are the locals. Even though the health care is not, it's more than adequate and affordable enough that pay-as-you-go really is a viable option. While Ecuador is not as safe as Dubai (few places are), with more than seven years of experience living in this country, we feel as secure as we would in most rural areas of the United States or Canada.

Some say there's nothing to do in Vilcabamba, but I'm busier now than when I was working. Since moving here, I've been designing houses, working on graphic designs, building furniture, doing some public speaking, traveling a bit, writing, and taking lots of photographs. Sue's been busy helping me as she continues to hone her baking skills while dabbling in things like welding and cement crafts.

And we both tend to our property. That alone can be a full-time job the way anything green grows here in Ecuador. It's a rewarding experience eating homegrown bananas. And using them to make banana bread. And banana muffins. And banana cream pie. And banana jam. And banana pancakes. And...well, you get the idea.

We used to "look forward" to getting up at 5 a.m. to beat Dubai's rush-hour traffic. Now we look forward to just getting up each day. Our rooster can't wait either. 

In theory, we traded more for less moving from Dubai to Vilcabamba in 2007, but we'd say today, seven years later, that we definitely came out ahead. We made a change in our life because we wanted a better life, the kind that is measured not by cost but quality.

Of course, we've enjoyed the budget benefits of being in Ecuador, too. The low cost of living is a great perk for a country that already has so much to offer.

So while economics may be a driving force in your considering a move to another country—for example, Ecuador—I urge you to explore other motivations too. You'll be glad you did. By doing so, you'll increase the chances of being happy in your new home. The low-cost-of-living benefit can be there, but move to a new country solely for that reason and you're limiting your upside.

John Curran

 

Continue Reading: Part-Time Retirement In Cuenca, Ecuador, And Medellin, Colombia

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"Ecuador law requires a two-year minimum for rentals," Graciela pointed out. "You don't want to deal with that until you're certain of your plans."

Again, the best news about the rental market in Cuenca is that rental rates remain very low on a global scale. A typical monthly rent for a standard, unfurnished, one- to two-year rental is US$300.

"When trying to find a rental, don't believe everything you read on the Internet," counseled our man in Cuenca, Ecuador Correspondent David Morrill. "You can find a lot of information about apartment rentals on blogs and social media, but you really need to get in the market and see for yourself.

"Tell an expat in Cuenca that you're considering renting an apartment for US$500 a month, and he's likely to say something like: 'What?! Why would you pay that much? I'm renting for just US$300 a month!'

"Maybe he is, but those kinds of conversations usually don't consider differences in neighborhoods and building amenities, for example. If you were renting an apartment in New York, you'd understand that you'd pay more in downtown Manhattan than you would in Queens. The same is true everywhere in the world, including in Cuenca. Neighborhoods can be very different when it comes to rentals, both in terms of what's available and also in terms of cost."

Expats in Cuenca typically prefer to be near the historical district, not in it. More than 70% of Graciela's rentals are in this area, within walking distance of the city's historical center.

How do you launch a search for a rental in Cuenca? As most anywhere in the world these days, the typical place to start is the Internet. When you go online, search in Spanish. Look for arriendas or se renta. Local newspaper classifieds can also be a good place to start, especially if you are looking for something long-term.

Otherwise, you can walk the streets looking for rental signs and asking around. The best deals are found through word-of-mouth.

"It's important, when renting a place to live in Ecuador," Graciela explained, "to try to understand the culture. Many of my clients will say, 'In the United States, we do it this way...'

"You need to remember that we are not in the United States. In Ecuador everything is different—the culture, the workers, how we work, the legal system, the bureaucracy...

"'Unfurnished,' for example," Graciela continued, "may mean no appliances, no curtains, no lighting fixtures...very basic."

To state the obvious, rental agreements are going to be in Spanish, so you'll want someone who speaks Spanish and English and who you trust to review your agreement before you sign. Confirm how to get your deposit back, for example, and, very important, who is responsible for what.

"It is common for the tenant to be responsible for small repairs like a leaky faucet," Graciela said, "but we've had cases where the landlord has said, 'I'm not responsible for replacing the roof.'

"Or there could be an old microwave that's not working," she continued, "and I mention it during the inspection. The owner might say, 'Well, the tenant needs to pay for it, because it's in their hands.'"

"None of this should frighten you off the idea of renting in Cuenca," David added. "We're just trying to help you understand so you can be prepared. You want to do more due diligence here than you would back home, not less."

Kathleen Peddicord

P.S. Graciela and David's detailed and tell-all discussion of how to be a renter in Cuenca during last week's Live and Invest in Ecuador Conference was recorded, along with every other presentation over the two-and-a-half days of this event.

These audio recordings are being edited now to create our all-new Live and Invest in Ecuador Home Conference Kit.

You can purchase your copy of this everything-you-need-to-know-about-Ecuador resource pre-release and save more than 50%. Do that here now.

 

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Feedback from attendees at last week's Live and Invest in Ecuador Conference in Quito...

"You covered more subjects than I imagined and feel everything I was interested in was presented."

--Annie Rikel, United States
***

"More than met my expectations. Speakers were a wealth of valuable information; very specific to my needs."

--Lorea Gervais, United States
***

"Good information on renting. Good to hear the perspective of an American but at the same time an Ecuadorian."

--Angie DeLeal, United States
***

"Great to hear from a few expats that have stories about their experience from moving and retiring in Ecuador."

--Keith Lindsay, Canada
***

"Lee is fantastic. He has found his niche. Made this program go. Am glad to have found you people. Will see you again soon."

--Tom Woody, United States
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— Arlean K., United States

Kathleen Peddicord

Kathleen Peddicord is the founder of the Live and Invest Overseas publishing group. With more than 25 years experience covering this beat, Kathleen reports daily on current opportunities for living, retiring, and investing overseas in her free e-letter.

Her book, How To Retire Overseas—Everything You Need To Know To Live Well Abroad For Less, was recently released by Penguin Books.

Read more here.

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