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Health Care In Mexico

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​Learn more about ​​MEXICO​ ​​​and other countries in our free, daily Overseas Opportunity Letter​​​​​​​​​. Simply enter your email address below and we’ll send you our FREE REPORT – ​Mexico: Home To The World's Largest Population Of North American Retirees
 

Mexican Health Care is High-Quality and Affordable

Mexico offers affordable, international-standard health care and medical tourism in this country is a booming industry. Health care in Mexico is top-notch, as it is one of the 10 most visited countries in the world for medical care.

The Mexico health care system provides both public and private options. The treatment and care are high-quality and affordable. You can find at least one hospital in every mid-sized and large city. Many Mexican doctors are trained in the United States, Europe, or Canada and speak English fluently and most medical workers at all levels speak basic-to-good English. Any town we direct you to in Mexico would have adequate local facilities to treat basic ailments, be it a clinic or a hospital.

Cost of Health Care in Mexico

The doctors here will spend time with you and often provide their home and cellphone numbers so you can contact them directly. Many doctors make house calls. Several expats commented that the cost of a routine office visit was the same or less than their copays back in the United States, around US$30. Specialists are available in town in private practice or in Querétaro. Fees are in the range of 500−800 pesos (around US$25-50) per visit. Expats report high levels of satisfaction with quality and cost both with doctors and dentists in Mexico.

Prices are an average of 50-70% cheaper than in the United States. This is across the board. From surgery to meds, everything is cheaper in Mexico. Expats often report that the service is better too. Doctors still make home visits, and it’s not unusual for doctors to call you regularly to talk about your progress. The patient is treated with great respect in Mexico, and you will never be rushed through an appointment. Of course this means that doctors are often running late, but it’s a price worth paying.

Like many countries in Latin America, Mexico has developed a broad-based health system that comprises complex institutional structures. Following several health care reforms, the resulting system is a segmented delivery structure with three separate components: a Social Security system that covers workers in the formal sector (and also accepts voluntary applications, see below), a public-services system that provides services to a portion of the lower and middle classes, and a diverse private sector that covers Mexican citizens from various economic backgrounds.

Private Health Care In Mexico

Most expats in Mexico prefer to have private health care, which means paying for private health insurance.

Private health care in Mexico comes with many benefits. The standard of the hospitals is high. Private hospitals in Mexico are clean and modern with access to the latest technologies and procedures. Waiting times are typically much shorter than in the U.S. both for appointments and treatment.

English-speaking staff are also easier to find at private facilities. If you choose to use public health care in Mexico then you will need to speak Spanish or go with someone who can translate for you.

Foreigners usually apply for the insurance offered by the Mexican Institute of Social Security as a major medical fallback because the health care provided is sometimes deficient. Once you are a resident, you can apply to IMSS, and, if accepted, you will renew the contract each year and pay the annual fee.

Mexico is also a top choice for dental tourism.

General Health Information

Make sure all your vaccinations are up-to-date before travelling to Mexico. The emergency number in Mexico is 911. Learn some basic Spanish phrases beforehand so you can speak with the operator.

Rabies is not a big problem in Mexico but in some rural areas it is possible to see rabid dogs. Malaria cases are unusual, but not unheard of. Wear insect reppelant if you are travelling into the jungle.

More Resources From Mexico

Get Your Free​ ​Mexico Report Today!
 

​Learn more about ​​MEXICO​ ​​​and other countries in our free, daily Overseas Opportunity Letter​​​​​​​​​. Simply enter your email address below and we’ll send you our FREE REPORT – ​Mexico: Home To The World's Largest Population Of North American Retirees